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Miket
05-02-05, 05:40 PM
I've got loads of VCR video's I want to transfer to DVD, has anybody got Pinnacle Studio AV/DV Deluxe or Dazzle Hollywood DV Bridge lying about that they don't use and are wanting to sell. :thumb: :thumb:

While here, I have got a new Logitech Cordless Optical Mouse and it eats batterys for a pass time, 2 every 2 weeks, is this normal. :confused: :confused: :thumb:

Dutch Paul
05-02-05, 05:44 PM
Batteries last for a few months in mine

gareth08
05-02-05, 10:13 PM
mike
I've got just about every piece of video/dvd edting software you'll ever need.
PM me with you want and you're address and i'll copy it and send it to you.
Or try www.dvdrhelp.com There is loads of stuff software/help guides etc there as well.
Regards
Gareth

shadow
05-02-05, 11:18 PM
As long as you can transfer VHS to DV I got a copie of Pinnacle which is easy to use. I can burn it off and post it to you. :thumb:

Be nice to return the help I've recived in some way. :D

Miket
05-02-05, 11:24 PM
Gareth and Steve

I have Pinnacle studio 8, but I need the hardware to transfer from VHS to the comp. :confused: :confused: I think

shadow
05-02-05, 11:29 PM
I'm not sure about S/W for VHS to PC, but if you have a DV Cam and if it has a video in, record from the VCR? :confused: Maybe a video capture card in your PC may be needed and record via S-Video. Not to hot on this set up I'm affraid :rolleyes:

gareth08
05-02-05, 11:37 PM
Mike
you will need a VHS to Digital card or if you have a USB or Firewire port (and a lead to connect you're VCR to comp) the software to convert analogue signals to digital (MPEG format) so that you're pc can regognise them.

I have all the software to do this you just need the lead.

There is a cheat way of doing it though.Providing you can connect you're VCR to a Digital camcorder you can play the VHS tape (in you're VCR) and record this to you're camcorder.You can then transfer that to you're pc and use video edting software to transfer to VCD/SVCD or DVD (MPEG).

Most pC's come with a basic programme which will allow you to connect a camcorder to it and transfer to your hard drive for edting etc.

You will also need a GOOD quality burning software.I personally use NERO 6 Ultra as you can burn all formats including .bin & .cue files.
Gareth

gareth08
05-02-05, 11:40 PM
Mike
Pinnacle studio 8 is out of date now.Latest version is 10.8 I belive.
I don't use it anymore as it's to slow.With latest software I can rip and burn a 4.7 gig DVD in about 6 mins. Pinnacle would take about 7 hours to do that.
Gareth

Bowtie
06-02-05, 08:16 AM
As already said, you will need a way to capture the VHS video and transfer it to your computer. Then you need an editing software to edit and render it in a a format of your selection (MPEG1 for VCD, MPEG2 for DVD or DivX, WM9 etc.). Finally you might consider an authoring software if you want menus etc. on your DVDs.

I have worked with most PC based hard and software and this is a couple of ways to do it (depending on your available hardware etc.).



If you got a video in enabled DV camera (this is maybe the easiest one). Hook your VHS or S-VHS up to your DV camera (trough composite or s-video cabling). Connect your DV camera to your computer trough FireWire (iLink for Sony) etc. Put the DV camera in recording mode (note that you usually donít even need a DV tape in the camera when you capture trough it). Put the tape you want to capture in the VHS/S-VHS player and start playback. Use a capture program of your choice and start capture to your PC (you will need about 15-20 Gb of free hard disk space for every hour of film). Start your editing software and edit the captured material (if needed). Render the edited material in a suitable format (MPEG, DivX etc.). Start your authoring software if needed and author your DVD menus etc. Finally burn the result to disc (VCD, DVD etc.).


Use a cheap analog capture card (most analog tv-cards for the PC got a video and s-video socket for capturing. Connect your VHS or S-VHS up to your PC (trough composite or s-video cabling). Put the tape you want to capture in the VHS/S-VHS player and start playback. Use a capture program of your choice and start capture to your PC. The rest is as above.


Use specific hardware to capture your videos. This includes capture boards with built in MPEG compression and standalone boxes. The principles are the same but the burden on the PC is less (since more work is done in dedicated hardware). It might ease the workflow a bit but I personally find my self doing the same job from the editing part and forward anyway.
TBC (time based correction); comb filters etc. improve quality of the captured material. Thatís what you find in dedicated hardware and high end S-VHS players. A 10-bit analog capture card will reduce noise compared to the more common 8-bit circuitry found on low end tv- and capture-cards.

Some recommended hard- and software:

DV-cams, Sony equipment has never failed me. Most video-in disabled cams can be made video-in enabled by software patching (search the web or contact a video specialist).

Capturing software, I prefer ScenalyzerLive (http://www.scenalyzer.com) but most editing software contains one.

Editing software, I highly recommend Sony Vegas (http://mediasoftware.sonypictures.com/products/vegasfamily.asp). I have used most other solutions for the PC but none comes close to Vegas in stability, usability and productivity.

Authoring software, Vegas+DVD (http://mediasoftware.sonypictures.com/products/vegasfamily.asp) contain DVD Architect and that is a strong combo. DVD-lab (http://www.mediachance.com/dvdlab/) is another favorite of mine, easy and intuitive.

S-VHS decks. DVD is taking over the role of tapes so there is a fair chance to find quality S-VHS decks for a good price right now. I bought a JVC HR-S7950EU because it has a better tuner (if you want to use it as a video recorder) than the Panasonic line. It also has TBC not found on many S-VHS decks these days.

Analog capture cards, I use a 10-bit card named LifeView FlyVideo 2000. Great value for money (but so is most cards with Philips or Conexant 10-bit circuits).

Dedicated hardware, Canopus (http://www.canopus-uk.com) makes fantastic stand alone products for video capturing.

I also recommend to take a look at the following amaizing softwares, VirtualDub (http://www.virtualdub.org) [/url]and[url="http://www.tmpgenc.net"] TMPGEnc (http://www.virtualdub.org/).


/ Bowtie

Miket
06-02-05, 04:39 PM
Mike
you will need a VHS to Digital card or if you have a USB or Firewire port (and a lead to connect you're VCR to comp) the software to convert analogue signals to digital (MPEG format) so that you're pc can regognise them.

I have all the software to do this you just need the lead. Gareth I have the latest Nero 6 also, A copy of the software to do the above with firewire would be great.

What lead do I need, sorry I'm a dummy, but willing to learn from the master. :thumb: :thumb:

Miket
06-02-05, 04:41 PM
Bowtie

Thanks, interesting post, have loads of options now. :thumb::thumb:

gareth08
06-02-05, 06:24 PM
Mike
Do you have a video capture card on you,re pc already.
If you do then you will need either a s-video(from video recorder) to usb/firewire(pc) lead or a scart (from video) to usb/firewire (pc) lead.
If you do not have a video capture card (this converts analogue signals from you're video to digital for you're pc) then you could capture the vhs tape on you're video to you're digital cam.Most videos and camcorders have s-video/audio input and output jacks (usually coloured yellow , red and black)So you will need either an s-video to s-video lead or a s-video to audio/video jacks.

Gareth

Miket
06-02-05, 08:38 PM
Mike
Do you have a video capture card on you,re pc already.
If you do then you will need either a s-video(from video recorder) to usb/firewire(pc) lead or a scart (from video) to usb/firewire (pc) lead.
If you do not have a video capture card (this converts analogue signals from you're video to digital for you're pc) then you could capture the vhs tape on you're video to you're digital cam.Most videos and camcorders have s-video/audio input and output jacks (usually coloured yellow , red and black)So you will need either an s-video to s-video lead or a s-video to audio/video jacks.

Gareth
The graphics card is a NVIDIA Ge Force 6800LE which has an s-video socket, in the support manual it says it is Composite TV/Video out, is this a capture card

gareth08
06-02-05, 08:50 PM
Mike
Yes but only for video out .
You need a in/out capture card.
As it goes I belive that pc world are doing a package to do all this.
I'll go and check it out and get back to you
Gareth

gareth08
06-02-05, 09:40 PM
Mike
The best way for you to do this is as follows;

Get either the ADAPTEC USB Video converter £99.99 (product code 834571) which is an external device and plugs into you're USB port or the ADAPTEC AVC-2010PCI card £69.99 (product code 700859) which is a internal card (you have to take case of pc and put inside).Both are available from pc world and come with instuctions and software to use.

The software probably won't be great but will do the job for you but once you have the card/s to transfer video to pc you can use all sorts of software which I have but Nero 6 is pretty good for that as well.It's only when you want to start authoring DVd's etc and putting menus in that you need other software.

Regards
Gareth

Miket
06-02-05, 09:42 PM
Thanks for all your help mate. :thumb: :thumb: :thumb:

Bowtie
06-02-05, 09:44 PM
A regular VHS deck is only putting out composite video signal (low quality). It requires an S-VHS deck to put out s-video (higher quality) and it requires S-VHS recordings on a S-VHS tape to make full use of it. But TBC or even a good comb filter can work magic cleaning up an old VHS tape trough s-video...