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Purple AK
26-06-05, 10:17 PM
I was approached by a guy from Sureterm Direct at Bromley Pagent today (they sponsor it). He was keen to offer 15% discount to CRC members. Looking briefly at their website, they offer guaranteed values for drivers 17-74 years. Anyone looking to renew or start insurance, give them a call (link in links and files) and report back. May be interesting ;)

Miket
26-06-05, 10:24 PM
Chris

I got a quote from them on Friday, reasonable price of 295 for 3000 miles and 23000 agreed value, only one downside for me is that you have to have a Thatcham cat 2 immobiliser fitted, I priced an immobiliser fitted at 145, so it makes it expensive insurance for the first year.

Might be worth fitting one in the future, I didn't have much time this year, as my insurance was due yesterday. :-(:thumb: :thumb:

fcukruss
27-06-05, 08:08 PM
i am with sureterm and cant fault them,303 18 value,3k miles a year,i have a thatcham 1 alarm installed but didnt need it for the insurance.


russ

Chimeara
27-06-05, 08:17 PM
I was approached by a guy from Sureterm Direct at Bromley Pagent today (they sponsor it). He was keen to offer 15% discount to CRC members. Looking briefly at their website, they offer guaranteed values for drivers 17-74 years. Anyone looking to renew or start insurance, give them a call (link in links and files) and report back. May be interesting ;)

Are you sure about the 17 years old bit I called them when I was struggling to find insurance at my old age of 20 and theys aid I had to be 25

Anthony

shadow
27-06-05, 09:03 PM
i am with sureterm and cant fault them,303 18 value,3k miles a year,i have a thatcham 1 alarm installed but didnt need it for the insurance.


russ

Bit steep for 18 Value :p

fcukruss
27-06-05, 09:34 PM
yep you got me!!!

gd02 cob
27-06-05, 10:09 PM
What is the max value they will insure? If I remember correctly when I approached them last year for a quote their max was only 25000.

Nick

JonnyT
28-06-05, 09:59 AM
From personal experience I have had difficulties with sureterm. I wanteed to insure a classic car. They went through the usual questions at the usual rate of knots and in haste I didn't tell them about an SP30 that was 41/2 years old. On this basis I wrote the insurance policy with them. My simple mistake of course showed when I sent them a copy of my licence. Rather than accept what it was they attempted to raise the policy price by 35% as a result when they found out. It took me 6 months and the County Court to get most of my premium back (judge decided on a perverse principle of fairness rather than the law and therefore accepted a quantum meruit argument) after I cancelled the policy.

Whilst this was a mistake made by me the near spent SP30 (from investigations done by a friend afterwards) made no difference to the premium if declared on the telephone. I also found them very difficult to deal with during the whole debacle, and there was no room to negotiate with them to reach a sensible resolution - customer service was appalling.

Now whilst this type of mistake can be avoided by ensuring that the operators do their job properly, I would be most concerned as to the attitude that they would take in the event of an accident and an opportunity to avoid cover. Lets not forget that the purpose of insurance is to protect our own personal funds in the event that we have an accident. If the insurance company resile from the policy and refuse to pay out after an accident then it is our houses, cars, personal effects etc, that will be taken to discharge the sums due to the injured party. However, as I say this was my own personal experience.

fcukruss
28-06-05, 06:18 PM
best to be upfront fro mthe beginning,if they are 4 1.2 years old old and are still on your license,spent or not they are still there.
when i insured with them at first,i had a nightmare of an insurance history.I knocked a child over whilst riding my R1,and have an ongoing personal injury claim against me and i also had six points on my license and still only 303.bargain.

as for not paying out after an accident,lets remember that sureterm are the broker and not the insurance company.These days insurnace companies seldom throw out a claim because whatever happens they have to indemnify the loss.ie if you had two bald tyres on your car and had an accident,they have to proove outright that they were the cause of the accident and they cant.If you said a car swerved infront of you and as a result you swerved and hit the other car,youve won.

If anyone has any trouble with insurance companies again i would suggest that you speak direct to the manager and tell him that you are taking your case to the insurance ombudsman,it costs the insurance company 500 even if they win the case,you pay nothing,so its in their interest to sort it amicably.


russ

robinj66
29-06-05, 10:02 AM
For the avoidance of doubt, penalty points are valid for three years from the date they were imposed (for the purposes of "totting") but cannot be removed from your licence for four years.

When "negotiating" (ha ha) with Insurance companies for a contract you need to declare anything within the time period that they specify - otherwise you are misrepresenting your position and potentially allowing the insurance compny to Void (cancel) your policy which they can almost certainly charge you for. You may also be commiting a criminal offence of Making a False Statement to Obtain Insurance.

Not sure if that's the right spelling of "commiting":o

plod
29-06-05, 01:55 PM
For the avoidance of doubt, penalty points are valid for three years from the date they were imposed (for the purposes of "totting") but cannot be removed from your licence for four years.

When "negotiating" (ha ha) with Insurance companies for a contract you need to declare anything within the time period that they specify - otherwise you are misrepresenting your position and potentially allowing the insurance compny to Void (cancel) your policy which they can almost certainly charge you for. You may also be commiting a criminal offence of Making a False Statement to Obtain Insurance.

Not sure if that's the right spelling of "commiting":o

Not sure if that's the right spelling of company either..? :finger:

Good points raised by all however. The offence is one of dishonesty which I'd say would probably never get anywhere. Police not really that interested unless you're someone of interest, and any solicitor worth his salt would say 'cant you just sort it out between you?' It would all essentially go through the small claims courts.

Read the ******* question is the answer.. :thumb:

JonnyT
29-06-05, 02:15 PM
Most insurance companies ask for SP30s to be declared for 5 years in my experience - i.e. after they have been removed from your licence for all other purposes. As I said I accept that I made a mistake - my complaint is over teh way a genuine mistake was handled.

Technically for a moment, a material misrepresentation made to an insurance company gives that company the right to avoid the contract of insurance. This avoidance operates 'ab initio' (from the outset of the policy) and the parties are therefore entitled to be placed back in the position that they were in prior to the contract formation - that is that they are not entitled to charge anything for it. The reason for this is that in large policies it is not equitable to allow the insurance company to avoid paying very large sums of money in claims whilst retaining the premium. The only arguable case is that they are entitled to claim for the misrepresentation per se which arguably gives rise to claim for payment for the work that they have completed. However, if they avoid the contract the convoluted terms and conditions are of no effect because they have avoided them.

Whilst in many cases it is right to say that for the purposes of PR many insurance companies (though not all) will not avoid small claims, if you are the cause of a large accident involving significant personal injury, they will try every trick in the book to avoid liabilty. It is at this stage that the co-operation of the insurance broker - the insured's (and not the insurer's) agent, is essential to avoid potentially catastrophic reults of the insurance company avoiding cover and refusing to pay.