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Dax SC
18-11-05, 06:56 PM
Any one had any experience with this set up, instead of using an external slave cylinder?

Engine is a 426ci 390stroker mated to a Tremec 600 via a McLeod scattershield.

Purple AK
18-11-05, 07:03 PM
Mark. No personal experiece, But there have many posts on here in the past about banjo leaks and seal failure due to overstroking. With all the headaches of gearbox removal and clutch plate replacement that go with it. :(

salmon
18-11-05, 07:18 PM
Hi Mark,

I have the Hydraulic Throwout on my car, 383 stroker (approx 450 BHP) with Billet steel flywheel, Mcleod 800 series 11" clutch and a TKO600. The Throwout bearing works well and is from Howe Racing (no Banjo bolts, although I think the Mcleod MK2 bearing no longer has banjo bolts) the clutch is lighter than I expected it to be.

Works best with a 3/4" bore master cylinder according to Howe Racing, works for me anyway.

I haven't done too many miles as I have driving it around on trade plates till the SVA.

Comes with spacers to set the clearance, as long as the clearance is correct overstroking shouldn't be an issue.

Regards
Chris

ps got the parts from Summit Racing.

dinosoar
18-11-05, 07:23 PM
I had to remove a gearbox from a GD this year to replace the seals in a McLeod release bearing. Big job for a few o rings. would have been much easier with an external slave.
I suspect that some of these fail due to lack of use. This particular one had been sitting in the car for quite some time during build and may have had the rubber start to "set" in position.
Go for an external cylinder if you have the room.

Andy

crendonman
19-11-05, 05:43 AM
IMHO

Dont touch the Internal Hydraulic system.

External system is much more reliable and when a seal goes at least you dont have to take out the transmission (and engine) to get to the offending area.

External slave is far far better.

adricar2
19-11-05, 07:58 AM
mark

i have used a mccloed hydraulic cylinder for over 10 years , and no problem with it. i do believe others have had a problem with them though. if you use one make sure that it is set to the clearence specified, with the beaing.
i am now using the wilwood pull cylinders , these are a long stroke slave unit and fit external.i have made a custom bracket and release arm so as it will fit in the transmission tunnel.if you need help with this give me a ring and i can tell you how i do mine.

mikey
19-11-05, 01:09 PM
Go on the club cobra american site and do a search on hydraulic clutch bearing. It will horrify you how many people have problems. It does not seem to be down to quality of installation, but luck.

It certainly disuaded me, a number had had to change them several times in very short periods of time before they got one that didn't leak
Mike

Clarkson
19-11-05, 04:52 PM
I have had untold problems with mine.:angry:

Go for the external type!:thumb:

Dax SC
19-11-05, 05:19 PM
Thanks for all the replys.

I am still torn with what to go for, especially as I think I may have chasis rail clearance issues with the external slave cylinder. My supplier says that the internal throw out bearings are 'bullet-proof' and he supplies many top end builders in the U.S. using Ford big blocks. But, I had previously read many threads on the U.S. sites where people have encountered problems. and having to disconnect the trans and scattershield to fix it does not sound like fun!

So, I think I'll go for the external slave set-up and hope it fits, if not internal!

dingocooke
19-11-05, 10:18 PM
Ignore your supplier, they might be bullet proof, but they (nearly) all leak.
Firing bullets at them would be a good idea, operating a clutch with one is definately not.
The best thing to do with the Mcleod throw out bearing is to carefully remove all fluid (so as not to kill the fish), and throw it in the canal.
Or it might make quite a nice paperweight.
The MK2 Mcleod in my car has been correctly asembled from new, resealed twice in 14 months, and is currently weeping (again).
I have emailed Mcleod USa 5 times politely asking for a solution, but no reply.
They clearly know their throwout bearing is rubbish, so ignore our complaints, and keep taking our money. Its a shame, because most US made kit is good quality and well supported, they're letting the side down.
I'd persevere making an external cylinder work, unless you get pleasure from frequent gearbox removal.
Dont know about any of the other internal hydralic throw out bearings that are available, but in my opinion the Mcleod should be avoided. Its the only thing on my car that has not pleased me, and I intend to engineer an external cylinder solution for it soon.
Hope this helps.
Regards
Steve
P.S-If McLeod are reading this, answer your emails, stand by your products, and you would not get this kind of bad press

LRdriver
20-11-05, 08:48 AM
I agree with the sentiments here, the throwout is crap. The amount of labour required to replace the seals is silly and it seems very hit'n'miss even when you set it up exactly by the numbers. Very frustrating and I found it a weak point in my old Cobra.

If you really want one, I have a brand new one sitting here at home that you can have for 200. Its a macleod gen II version with elbow joints instead of banjos. I had ordered it after changing seals for the second time when I was about to throw parts at the car. But at risk of talking my way out of a sale, I wouldnt bother with them as they are unreliable crap.

wilf
20-11-05, 11:33 AM
Well, there you go - some swear by them, some swear at them.

The thing to remember is that these concentric slave cylinders were essentially a race - biased piece - weight saving and all that. Race cars are, by their very nature, torn apart and rebuilt on a regular basis. Race engineers could care less about the longevity of any item, all it has to do is last a season (or sometimes just the race), and help the car go faster.

If you have the option, why fit an item which has a history of unreliablity (in the longterm, on a road car that is expected to remain reliable for years) when there is a perfectly reasonable alternative that can be serviced without separating the engine and 'box?

Seems like a no-brainer to me.