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Robin427
16-09-07, 04:45 PM
Am I right in thinking that the most damaging light from welding is the invisible UV light which is mostly filtered out by the clear lens in a welding helmet, the dark lens protecting you from the dazzling effect of the visible light which isn't so dangerous?

Just bought an auto-darkening helmet but worried what might happen if the batteries run flat

RichardG
16-09-07, 05:11 PM
Am I right in thinking that the most damaging light from welding is the invisible UV light which is mostly filtered out by the clear lens in a welding helmet, the dark lens protecting you from the dazzling effect of the visible light which isn't so dangerous?

Just bought an auto-darkening helmet but worried what might happen if the batteries run flat

Test it before using it! Just looking at a light bulb should darken it.

Robin427
16-09-07, 05:21 PM
Test it before using it! Just looking at a light bulb should darken it.

Aaarrgghh!! My eyes! My eyes! That's a bright light bulb...

dave
16-09-07, 05:35 PM
You bought one with batteries???:D:D:D
Why did you not get a solar powered one? Kind of sorts itself out when the welding starts. i.e. Bright light= charged battery.;)

Robin427
16-09-07, 05:48 PM
It has a solar cell on the front too - perhaps the batteries are just a backup?

craggle
16-09-07, 05:56 PM
If you look through the mask without it being dimmed it should not be perfectly clear. My mask is a solar powered one and it is still quite dark to look through, but clear enough to see what you need. It gets a lot darker once you look at a strip light, The sun or strike an ark with the welder.

I think it would be brighter if the batteries failed but not bright enough to damage your eyes.

Craig.

jools
16-09-07, 06:59 PM
You're correct in saying that the glass stops uv rays. You wont get a suntan in a conservatory. However the degree of darkness stops the glare which, on its own, can be quite damaging to the retina.
The brightest arc is when TIG welding so consequently the glass needs to be darker than if MIG welding & aluminium welding gives off an intense light as well.
If it's arc eye you're worried about that shouldn't be an issue even if the auto-dimming fails as the clear lens will protect you. It is rare that these masks fail though.

Andy S
16-09-07, 08:55 PM
Stuff the lens in the helmet.
HE's GOT A BL00DY WELDER NOW AS WELL!!!!!!!!!!!!!.
Oh my god, we are all doomed.....................
Robin go back to flying planes mate, its got to be safer ???????????

Robin427
16-09-07, 09:49 PM
Thank you everyone, apart from Andy :D
I had suspected that was the case. As Craig said, the mask is fairly dark before it activates so I won't need to wear sunglasses underneath...

It's a stick welder, in case anyone is interested - I have it on long-term loan and am intending to use it on the Landrover only :o

slogger
16-09-07, 10:42 PM
Thank you everyone, apart from Andy :D
I had suspected that was the case. As Craig said, the mask is fairly dark before it activates so I won't need to wear sunglasses underneath...

It's a stick welder, in case anyone is interested - I have it on long-term loan and am intending to use it on the Landrover only :o


......................going to weld up all those surplus holes you drilled?!:D

robinj66
16-09-07, 10:42 PM
If you're worried about broken sticks, I'm sure I have some whole ones laying about in the garden -save you the trouble of welding them:D

Robin427
17-09-07, 09:04 AM
Thanks, but what should I use to fix that Russian military jet I've just bought? :D

Ian - you're a cheeky git...

dingocooke
17-09-07, 09:53 AM
Am I right in thinking that the most damaging light from welding is the invisible UV light which is mostly filtered out by the clear lens in a welding helmet, the dark lens protecting you from the dazzling effect of the visible light which isn't so dangerous?

Just bought an auto-darkening helmet but worried what might happen if the batteries run flat

The clear glass at the front is really intended to be thrown away when the welding splatter has pock marked it, and its cheaper than replacing the actual filter lens. Its not intended as a filter, and it wont stop you getting arc eye; if it did you could just weld in normal specs!
If you manage to weld just looking through the front glass without the filter activated youll get arc eye (very unpleasant; for those who have not had it, imagine have sand in your eyes for 6 hours)

robinj66
17-09-07, 02:37 PM
Thanks, but what should I use to fix that Russian military jet I've just bought? :D

Ian - you're a cheeky git...


Cheap Eastern European labour (?):D

Neil O
17-09-07, 04:10 PM
or the Kirkham factory in Poland......;)

I predict a world shortage in welding sticks when Robin really gets going.

alfiebeard
17-09-07, 08:25 PM
The clear glass at the front is really intended to be thrown away when the welding splatter has pock marked it, and its cheaper than replacing the actual filter lens. Its not intended as a filter, and it wont stop you getting arc eye; if it did you could just weld in normal specs!
If you manage to weld just looking through the front glass without the filter activated youll get arc eye (very unpleasant; for those who have not had it, imagine have sand in your eyes for 6 hours)

Having been taken to hospital twice for getting what we used to term as flash,I can vouch for everything dingocooke said, its exactly like having sand in your eyes, and if you open them enough to let light in it is excruciating. at the time I was only 15yr old and it was my 1st job apprentice plater welder at a Carlisle steelworks, and I used to take my old dog to work with me and he got flash as well poor little git:(.the clear lens is just a cover to save replacing the more expensive filter, gas welding does,nt produce as bright an arc and does,nt give you flash, but is still harmfull to your eyes if you weld without a filter lens, these glasses dont have a clear glass in front of them as you dont get much spatter when gas welding.:cool: