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the rock doc
09-03-09, 02:20 PM
Didn't really know what to call this one. :confused:

I'm back in the UK in a couple of days and have to do a lot of work on a house before my daughter moves in (finally :mrgreen::mrgreen::mrgreen:)!!!

The walls are all dry lined i.e. plasterboard on dabs of plaster so that it is approx an inch away from the brickwork itself.

I need to hang a lot of stuff, i.e. coat hooks, curtain rails etc.

The gap isn't big enough for plasterboard rawplugs.

So what is best?

Just drill into the brickwork behind and put extra long screws in??

Or is there some magical filler on the market that you can fill the gap behind with and then use normal rawplugs.

I know, it sounds as clear as mud. :confused:

Cheers.

craggle
09-03-09, 02:28 PM
I know that is a recognized way of doing the job but it always seemed a really cheap and nasty way of doing it to me. Why not just plaster the wall itself, You will get a bigger room then!

I would say use the longer screws and go into the brick work itself. Anything hanging on the plasterboard alone is likely to pull out sooner or later.

Craig.

chedz
09-03-09, 02:31 PM
I'd go with longer screws too, you don't want things falling off. If you get really long ones you can nip round the neighbours and pop a large washer and a nyloc on the back too. Happy to help.
Graham

wilf
09-03-09, 02:35 PM
I use those plasterboard fixings that are basically big grey plastic screws with wide screw flights. Then a fairly normal wood screw goes into them.

If you have restricted depth behind the plasterboard you can nip off the end. Because this also removes the "self starting" properties of these things, I then knock a 4mm hole through the plasterboard (same diameter as the root diameter of the plastic things) with a cross head screwdriver.

Works a treat.

maxGD059
09-03-09, 03:12 PM
What's already said + get some 'Gripfill'. It's amazing stuff & does what it says

steve ferguson
09-03-09, 04:39 PM
I would always go into something solid if at all possible, you can cause more damage to the wall if using plasterboard fixings if it hits the brickwork. The plastic ones are not much cop anyway. IMHO. ;) I offer this advice as I put up curtain poles/ tracks/ blinds for a living. Good luck :)

andicole0
09-03-09, 04:54 PM
Something here (http://www.screwfix.com/cats/100067/Fixings/Cavity-Fixings) should help, maybe the RediDrivas or Hollow wall anchors.

Andi.

v8 capri
09-03-09, 05:18 PM
im in the building trade, and you are best to use the plasterbooard fixings, but not the plastic ones, you have to use the metal ones!! or there are another type called "cavity fixings" or "hollow wall fixings" you can easily get them at all diy stores
Cavity Fixings - Buy quality Cavity Fixings at Screwfix.com (http://www.screwfix.com/cats/100067/Fixings/Cavity-Fix) 8)

sorry andi,didnt realise you had posted same link

andicole0
09-03-09, 05:47 PM
im in the building trade, and you are best to use the plasterbooard fixings, but not the plastic ones, you have to use the metal ones!! or there are another type called "cavity fixings" or "hollow wall fixings" you can easily get them at all diy stores
Cavity Fixings - Buy quality Cavity Fixings at Screwfix.com (http://www.screwfix.com/cats/100067/Fixings/Cavity-Fix) 8)

sorry andi,didnt realise you had posted same link

NP I feel quite chuffed that the professionals agreed :cool:

Andi.

wilf
09-03-09, 05:48 PM
Yes but - if you only have between 1/2 and 1" of space between the back face of the plasterboard, and the front face of the brick/block work, you can't get those fixings in!

On that screwfix page, the "nylon easidrivers" are what I was refering to - they have consistently held all sorts of things up on walls around my place.

Miket
09-03-09, 05:59 PM
Can't advise sorry, as my house was built properly. ;) :D :D

wilf
09-03-09, 08:14 PM
What with - Radon-emitting stonework?

Geezer
09-03-09, 09:31 PM
im in the building trade, and you are best to use the plasterbooard fixings, but not the plastic ones, you have to use the metal ones!! or there are another type called "cavity fixings" or "hollow wall fixings" you can easily get them at all diy stores
Cavity Fixings - Buy quality Cavity Fixings at Screwfix.com (http://www.screwfix.com/cats/100067/Fixings/Cavity-Fix) 8)

sorry andi,didnt realise you had posted same link

Ditto. Have lived in several dry lined houses over the last 30 years and swear by the alloy screw in. Couple of things - when putting up curtain poles you usually come up against the lintel so cannot fix through, the screw in anchors are great for this. However, if the builder was switched on he may have attached wood to the lintel making the job a peace of pi55.:D

Best of luck

Pete

Geezer
09-03-09, 09:33 PM
Can't advise sorry, as my house was built properly. ;) :D :D

What, do you have $hit daubed over hay... ;):D:D

Pete

steve ferguson
09-03-09, 09:59 PM
However, if the builder was switched on he may have attached wood to the lintel making the job a peace of pi55.:D

Best of luck

Pete[/QUOTE]

This has never happened in 10 years! Concrete lintel is easy SDS. Steel can be a pain in the arse. The wrost is the Victorian pad with blown plaster with nothing behind, or lathe and plaster ceiling. Please buy a new timber framed house , perfect ;)

the rock doc
10-03-09, 04:21 AM
Thanks guys.

I'll pop along to my local B&Q at the weekend. :D

Geezer
10-03-09, 06:42 AM
However, if the builder was switched on he may have attached wood to the lintel making the job a peace of pi55.:D

Best of luck

Pete

This has never happened in 10 years! Concrete lintel is easy SDS. Steel can be a pain in the arse. The wrost is the Victorian pad with blown plaster with nothing behind, or lathe and plaster ceiling. Please buy a new timber framed house , perfect ;)[/quote]

Yep, it's the steel ones that I was talking about. Mind you, if there is wood attached to the lintel you have to make sure you have a screw of the right length...:D

Pete