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Deck
08-03-11, 12:15 PM
Hi Guys
Been out with the sand paper again and I'm getting a bit nervous about the state of my body!
All the splitlines on this baby are poor and I've had to expose a lot of the underlying mat to
get them flatish.

Will any amount of layers of primer match these up with the gel coat or do I
need to gouge them all out and build them back up with filler? Parts of the seam seem to be
solid enough but I'm worried the texture will always show or worse, reappear later!?
I'm particularly worried about this lead edge as it'll be very obvious and its exposed to wear.

Any advice and experience on this would be gratefully accepted.
Cheers

KevinW
08-03-11, 01:03 PM
others have more expertsie than me, but when i had my car sprayed the bodyshop applied large areas of filler to bring up low areas, and then sprayed the entire body with high build primer filler, twice. This was then flatted back, twice. Only then was the primer base coat added - pics in my gallery for a sumo body if you are interested. Air pockets will be a problem if you dont dig them out. Other than that I woudnt worry, or are you planning to spray the car yourself? Looks like you've rubbed a fair bit of gelcoat away, but i dont think it should matter as the entire body ought to be prepped before paint.

kdavies3
08-03-11, 01:06 PM
At the very least you're going to need several coats of a Hi build sealer primer, to cover that lot.
I've found that 2 pack primer sinks less over time than celulous.
Of course you will need to get some PPE (mask etc if your'e going to spray at home).
If you are I hope you get on well with your neighbours. ;)

craggle
08-03-11, 01:41 PM
As the others have said, High build primer over that and then flatted back again will be fine.

The seam lines on my Dax were rubbed through to the mat in a few places but with a high build primer, filler, plenty of flatting, two pack primer, wet flatting, base coat then clear coat it all looks fine and still does 5 years or so down the road.

Also as Kevin says, Look for pin holes and air pockets. If you think you find any dig into them and make sure there are or aren't there. Best to make some extra holes and fill them again than to miss any bubbles just under the surface that appear just after you've painted the car!

Craig.

V8bassman
08-03-11, 03:10 PM
If you are I hope you get on well with your neighbours. ;)

I thought I did, then six weeks after I finished painting the hawk last year, got a snotty letter from the local council informing me that they were investigating me for running a car spraying business from home. Apparently one of my neighbours had complained about the smell :eek:. I asked the council to let me know who it was so I could go round and 'apologise' in person but for some reason they wouldnt! :rolleyes:

Deck
08-03-11, 04:52 PM
...Air pockets will be a problem if you dont dig them out. Other than that I woudnt worry, or are you planning to spray the car yourself? Looks like you've rubbed a fair bit of gelcoat away...

Thanks for all the replies. I would like to say that this isn't where I've dug down into the surface,
this is where the two halves of the mould didn;t align and left a step in the surface.
Other areas are where the gel coat wasn't thick enough or applied at all! I've a few sections
that are pretty porous so I'm going to dig them out completely but I really didn't fancy trying
to remodel the entire top edge of the front!

I uncovered a few pockets of air under the gel coat when sanding so I freaked out and took a
planishing hammer to both sides of the split line and any hard to reach edges. This uncovered
a lot of cavities, one was about 3 inches long by 1 inch wide.

I'm considering putting the primer on myself but in work. There's a 3 phase compressor and some guns etc.
I might try IVA it with this and drive it around to see if anything cracks up before committing to a paint job.

Thanks again