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Doc Craig
01-07-16, 02:49 PM
Hi guys
I have just finished building a new workshop, so as to undertake my second Cobra build!
Just wondering if any of you could recommend a brand of particularity good floor paint?
Cheers
Doc

Lloyd Barnes
01-07-16, 03:18 PM
Can't really help on paint brands but as an alternative I have a mate who bought some 2 part resin, mixed it and poured it in his workshop.

His floor is fab, mine with floor paint was a total mess. Might be worth considering? :-)

Doc Craig
01-07-16, 03:26 PM
Thanks Lloyd I was thinking about a 2 part epoxy, but there are loads out there and I wondered what particular one to use, could you ask your mate for me?

Lloyd Barnes
01-07-16, 03:37 PM
Happy to. Give me a while.

KevinW
01-07-16, 03:42 PM
Interesting.
Lloyd: I have a concrete garage, which is damp all winter, and actually wet to the touch when during really rainy damp spells, but dries out in the summer.
I think the resin would be waterproof, so if I added a thin layer on top pf the concrete floor, do you think it would improve matters?
Kevin

Highlander
01-07-16, 04:03 PM
I'm always getting a little brochure sent to me from a company called Polycote www.polycote.com

They seem to have all flooring angles covered......pun intended:rolleyes: I will be looking at their OT primer and the flortex freeflow for my floor once the car is finished.

Lloyd Barnes
01-07-16, 04:21 PM
Interesting.
Lloyd: I have a concrete garage, which is damp all winter, and actually wet to the touch when during really rainy damp spells, but dries out in the summer.
I think the resin would be waterproof, so if I added a thin layer on top pf the concrete floor, do you think it would improve matters?
Kevin

No idea Kev, truthfully I know nothing about it. The lad I know is a design engineer for Bentley, extremely fussy and researches stuff to death before doing it right. I've seen the floor he's put down and its extremely nice and seems to be extremely tough.

Me, I slapped some floor paint down for years and it was useless!

nealgs
01-07-16, 05:50 PM
in the same boat on our newly build garage - used a pva solution at last garage which worked pretty well to keep dust done, last about 3yrs before a new coat needed, but PVA cost about £5.

just water it down, chuck on floor and brush round, let dry - simples.

Gary

RussellGower
01-07-16, 06:07 PM
PVA isn't water proof so will do nothing to protect from damp.

I've just done my garage floor, I put down a liquid damp proof membrane, followed by a fibre reinforce self levelling compound finished with porcelain tiles and I'm very please with the result.

R.

nealgs
01-07-16, 06:15 PM
ah, wasn't thinking about the water proofing side of it - more just dust levels.

Doc Craig
01-07-16, 06:35 PM
That sounds great Russell, but I've gone for a power floated (smooth/flat finish) concrete floor with a DPM below, so I wont need to go for a tiled floor, just a durable finish?

Highlander
02-07-16, 12:16 PM
That sounds great Russell, but I've gone for a power floated (smooth/flat finish) concrete floor with a DPM below, so I wont need to go for a tiled floor, just a durable finish?

If the concrete has been polished too much you may have to acid etch the floor first to get a good key for your top finish.......don't ask me how I know!:rolleyes:

peterj1974
02-07-16, 06:11 PM
I used 2 pack epoxy from regal paints. They also sell the acid etcher. Pleased with the results. Keeps the dust down

stu248
02-07-16, 08:39 PM
Interesting.
Lloyd: I have a concrete garage, which is damp all winter, and actually wet to the touch when during really rainy damp spells, but dries out in the summer.
I think the resin would be waterproof, so if I added a thin layer on top pf the concrete floor, do you think it would improve matters?
Kevin

Kev
If the damp is coming up through the floor I would expect any resin to loose its bond with the concrete and in time start to crack.

Cheers

KevinW
03-07-16, 09:27 AM
Thanks Stu, thats useful.
I think I am probably back to PlanA- Carcoon, in lieu of spending £10k on demolition and a new garage.

stu248
04-07-16, 08:48 AM
Thanks Stu, thats useful.
I think I am probably back to PlanA- Carcoon, in lieu of spending £10k on demolition and a new garage.

Kev

I know a few guys with Carcoon's and they swear by them, although Russell's solution at post 9 seems like a good one which could work for you and probably not too expensive, unless you have a HUGE garage to sort!

Cheers

aaronjb
04-07-16, 10:09 AM
Interesting.
Lloyd: I have a concrete garage, which is damp all winter, and actually wet to the touch when during really rainy damp spells, but dries out in the summer.
I think the resin would be waterproof, so if I added a thin layer on top pf the concrete floor, do you think it would improve matters?
Kevin

My garage was pretty damp with a lot of moisture coming up from the floor (and then condensing on the skylights and raining back down on everything!) - I'd lived with it for four years and considered it a design flaw..

Painted the garage floor with PVA and then Leyland Trade Frigate Grey[1] floor paint and there has been zero condensation since and everything is a thousand times drier. OK, it has lifted a little here and there but it's cheap and easy to repaint..

[1] - http://www.screwfix.com/p/leyland-trade-heavy-duty-floor-paint-frigate-grey-5ltr/88106

KevinW
04-07-16, 12:49 PM
Hi Aaron, I like the sound of that - x10 cheaper than a Carcoon.
But....how did you acccomplish this? Did you move everything out and put a massive tarp over everything for the 7 day drying period?
Or do half the floor and move all the garage contents across to do the other half?

- oh and whaat type of PVA? white goop or the blue stuff used for grp mould removal?

aaronjb
04-07-16, 02:06 PM
Two halves :) Easy in mine as there is a line down the middle between the two slabs! But yeah, moved everything to one side and painted the free side, waited a couple of days and moved it back.. the lack of waiting 7 days is partly why it has lifted in a couple of small areas.

Regular white decorating PVA followed by a watered down coat of the paint per the instructions and finished up with one full strength coat.

nealgs
04-07-16, 02:44 PM
that is the same PVA stuff that i used, albeit without the paint coat after - PVA worked fine, make it diluted enough so it gets soaked in, otherwise it will only cover surface and not soak in :)

Gary

aaronjb
04-07-16, 03:24 PM
Ah yes, forgot that step :) Dilute PVA (diluted with water IIRC) followed by paint diluted with white spirit. Mmm, smelly.

KevinW
04-07-16, 03:42 PM
OK....sounds like a plan.
Just got to fit it in amongst (a) trying to get car finished for IVA (b) house renovation project and (c) partner and 2 soon-to-be step kids moving in next month. :)

Lloyd Barnes
04-07-16, 08:08 PM
Thanks Lloyd I was thinking about a 2 part epoxy, but there are loads out there and I wondered what particular one to use, could you ask your mate for me?

This is the answer I got....

The Epoxy Resin was from a company called Flowcrete in Sandbach, Cheshire.

I recall it being something like £150 for a 25litre drum, but was definitely the right stuff... Has a pot life of 45-60mins depending on temperature, and you must prep the concrete by mechanical abrading (shot blasting) or acid etching to remove the latency on the top layer. Then we primed the concrete with an appropriate epoxy primer, and then poured, bladed and back rolled the top coat.

Doc Craig
05-07-16, 06:53 AM
Thanks Lloyd, that is the solution I will be going with.
BTW to sort out #5 (and similar) simply install a dehumidifier.

kdavies3
05-07-16, 07:12 AM
I concur the bit about acid etching a power floated floor.
I once painted a slab without doing it and the paint fell off in no time.
Also Aaron's tip about leaving it for 7 days after painting.

KevinW
05-07-16, 02:07 PM
Thanks Lloyd, that is the solution I will be going with.
BTW to sort out #5 (and similar) simply install a dehumidifier.

- have thought about that. Having heard about fires when these things fail, and the cost of running these, I'm a bit reluctant to splash cash.

I thionk Aaron's solution is a good solution. If it gets damp again after that I'll swallow the cost of the carcoon.

Doc Craig
05-07-16, 02:30 PM
Any form of heating is at best is a temporary solution, and anything like a Calor gas or parrafin heater will considerably exacerbate the problem. Next best thing to a dehum is simply good through flow-ventilation and that costs nout!

KevinW
05-07-16, 03:48 PM
OK I'm a bit confused....where was the heating suggestion? Isnt any solution , by definition, temporary, as all the problems go away in the summer?

Doc Craig
05-07-16, 04:17 PM
Bit of a long answer to that Kevin, but I’ll try to condense it (yeah rubbish pun I know!). Waterborne moisture comes from numerous places (even breathing) and this will find the driest place to evaporate to, which is usually outside in the summer. However in winter (or simply when it is raining) the atmosphere is no longer capable of absorbing the moisture and so it condenses on cold surfaces; and not just in your garage – even in a centrally heated house, condensation will revert to liquid water on a cold wall (typically behind a wardrobe) which then become algae.