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Richard Gibbs
17-08-18, 06:04 PM
So, the last 5 weeks off work to recuperate from too many long hours since last November has seen much progress on the Dax.

Body fixed, loom in place, heater in, windscreen in, windscreen washer and wipers in, lights in, brake pipes in, brake and clutch master cylinders in place.

Been working on the engine. Painted and polished.
Had to replace the bell housing dowel pins as some monkey had used a lump hammer to drive in the existing ones and made them expand so the bell housing wouldn't go on. Good news, bell housing is only 2 thou off centre. No need to realign.

Awaiting the bearing puller to remove an old pilot bushing. Before finally fixing the Mcleod RST twin plate clutch and gearbox.

If I can attach a picture the Chevy is here.

String
17-08-18, 06:40 PM
Sounds like good progress Richard! What heads on the SBC, Edelbrock of some kind? I’m weighing up options at the mo.

We’re doing similar builds so I’ll be interested to see your progress, good luck with it.

String
17-08-18, 06:44 PM
Apologies, can see from the photo they are Performer RPM 8089 - 195cc intake runners possibly. Cheers.

Richard Gibbs
17-08-18, 10:58 PM
Hi Tris

I wish I could tell you more about the engine. I had all the paperwork for the engine in the garage on the work bench and suffered from a mouse infestation. They shredded the whole envelope of documents. No better than a pile of dust.
It's a 383. Mild cam. Edelbrock heads, intake manifold and carb.
Tremec TKO 600 with an open 3.31 diff.
Should work well I feel.

Do you have the Dax/Corsa EPAS system? And if so, have you modified the plate at the front where the boss sits? The instructions say to cut it down to 39.5mm diameter. But that cuts off the locking tab on the top. Confused the he'll out of me today. Might speak with Dax on Monday before I make a cut too far.

Building a car is all about solving a seemingly never ending series of challenges! Great fun though.

What stage are you in the build?

String
18-08-18, 07:21 AM
Morning Richard, little blighters those mice. I hope you’ll be able to obtain a replacement proof of block certificate as it will be needed at IVA time. Sounds like a well balanced combo though, with it being all too easy to go OTT with a monster cam.

I’m sticking with the standard Sierra column, at least initially anyway. Bannon is putting together a great build blog on the Corsa EPAS system, fitting it to his MKIII Dax - have a look if you haven’t seen it yet, might be of help.

My build progresses rather steadily :rolleyes:; front end completed and ready to receive the engine and box. Building up the Chevy at the mo, researching parts & block clearanced for stroker crank, completing fitment of Simon hubs and knock off wheels, Avons to order soon. Yes, plenty of challenges but we’ll get there...lots to learn! Keep going.

Richard Gibbs
18-08-18, 07:54 AM
Morning.
The block casting was 8th April 1976. The casting numbers tell me. Not all the letters were ground out when block was decked. The ones that remain tell me it was cast at the GM Flint motor works.
I spoke with Frank Knight Racing a while back and they will verify. I'll make contact with them next week now the block is painted.

Selecting the parts combination for the engine seemed like it was too advanced for this novice which is why I got mine remanufactured and finished by those claiming they know what they are doing. We shall see upon start up.

Sound like you're building a special car. Keep updating. I shall do the same.

String
18-08-18, 09:27 AM
Nice one, mine was from Flint too, but Feb’ ‘73.

Part of the reason for going Chevy was due to the popularity of its use over decades. So if you choose to rebuild you are following in the foot steps of tens of thousands of other builders, so there’s loads of helpful info out there; books, web, gurus etc. Still, if a piston comes flying through the bonnet on start up, I’ll have to suck it up and try again :D

Will be interesting to know how you find the power over the full rpm range on your Dax, with those heads, inlet, gearing and rear end ratio etc. It’ll be a flyer though with a 383 under the hood! Cheers.

Richard Gibbs
18-08-18, 12:16 PM
Cheers.
My daughters boyfriend has a highly modified Porche. Engine has been rebuild to be stronger than Porche makes them. Slightly larger displacement and now turbocharged.
It must be sub 3 s to 60.
So I'll be in good company, though I probably won't compete with him. I simply don't want to.

Bearing puller arrived. Pilot bearing STILL WONT MOVE.

Wife has gone to Screwfix for some Arctic spray to freeze the hell out of it, as suggested by another forum member a few days ago.
Let's see if the combination of freezing and the puller works.

In the mean time I've filed down the EPAS mount to 39.5mm. I saw Brannon's thread. Very helpful.
Who could have known filing could be so much fun!

Richard Gibbs
18-08-18, 03:52 PM
Freezing and using the puller and the pilot bearing still won't budge.

Running out of options.

I'll see if my friendly mechanic has a professional pilot bearing puller that's man enough for the job.
In the mean time it's well and truly filled with penetrating oil and I'll leave it overnight and return to it afresh tomorrow.

I can't believe how stuck it is!

Good news. The EPAS is ready for installation.

Almost time for a G & T

TINKA
18-08-18, 04:11 PM
If you pack it with grease or bread and the shaft you hit is a very very close fit to the diameter of the pilot bearing it will work, simple law of hydraulics. Dont be scared to hit the shaft really hard you wont damage anything as long as it is packed thoroughly.

Richard Gibbs
18-08-18, 05:45 PM
Thanks Tinka.
I did try the grease / bread method. But couldn't get a shaft of the right size to just get into the bearing and not let it squirt grease out.
I shall try the puller again tomorrow having soaked the bearing in oil tonight.
Then, if that fails again I'll cut and shape a piece of wood to the correct dimensions to just get in and try grease again.

More to follow tomorrow. Success hopefully.

andy l
18-08-18, 07:14 PM
Hi Richard
Looking at the picture, the engine has a mechanical fuel pump fitted, this will hit the chassis rail, most use electric pump and blank off front pump area
good luck with the bearing removal

TINKA
19-08-18, 07:57 AM
Thanks Tinka.
I did try the grease / bread method. But couldn't get a shaft of the right size to just get into the bearing and not let it squirt grease out.
I shall try the puller again tomorrow having soaked the bearing in oil tonight.
Then, if that fails again I'll cut and shape a piece of wood to the correct dimensions to just get in and try grease again.

More to follow tomorrow. Success hopefully.

Just use the appropriate drill bit dackwards, a lot cheaper.

String
19-08-18, 08:24 AM
Hi Richard
Looking at the picture, the engine has a mechanical fuel pump fitted, this will hit the chassis rail, most use electric pump and blank off front pump area
good luck with the bearing removal

Andy, is this an issue with just the De Dion chassis with the quaife rack, or the IRS with the pre-quaife (dolomite?) rack too? I’m hoping the former :) Thanks. RCR build sounds fantastic!

Good luck with the pilot bearing removal Richard.

Richard Gibbs
19-08-18, 12:16 PM
Hi Guys

Thanks for the heads up Andy. I hadn't got to the point of trial fitting the engine. I didn't expect that to be an issue. But looks like I will need an electric pump then. Any recommendations given it's an Edelbrock carb and not fuel injection? I'm thinking correct fuel pressure here.

I shall update on the bearing removal later in the day. Still not budged! But we press ahead. It's not been welded. But it might as well have been. Removing the hubs from the drive shafts on the Jag back end was a piece of cake by comparison.

Richard Gibbs
19-08-18, 03:22 PM
Update on the pilot bearing.

Returned to the grease method earlier today. Cut wood to fit through the bearing with a tight fit. Still not tight enough. Grease comes out through the gaps in the needle rollers before the bearing moves. Tried the head of a socket cap set screw. A tight fit. But not tight enough.

Returned to the bearing puller. It broke before the bearing moved.

Tried heating and cooling to break the grip of bearing to crankshaft. That's when the puller gave up the game. That was one of the slide hammer types.

So now, have ordered a new three legged puller that is small enough to go through the centre of the bearing and with what appear to be solid hooks to make a good hold on the back of the bearing. I can apply a little pressure by tightening the nut and leave it for a few hours. Drink beer. Tighten a bit more. Leave it. Drink beer. And proceed over time to that moment of joy when that bloody bearing gives up and surrenders.

Further update at the end of the week. Time to order more beer. I may be in the garage for a long time. Perhaps I'll set up a deck chair in the drive!

Bannon
19-08-18, 03:34 PM
If possible, load up the puller nice and tight, then shock the bearing if you can get to it. Giving it a thump whilst pre-loaded by the puller may well shift it.


Update on the pilot bearing.

Returned to the grease method earlier today. Cut wood to fit through the bearing with a tight fit. Still not tight enough. Grease comes out through the gaps in the needle rollers before the bearing moves. Tried the head of a socket cap set screw. A tight fit. But not tight enough.

Returned to the bearing puller. It broke before the bearing moved.

Tried heating and cooling to break the grip of bearing to crankshaft. That's when the puller gave up the game. That was one of the slide hammer types.

So now, have ordered a new three legged puller that is small enough to go through the centre of the bearing and with what appear to be solid hooks to make a good hold on the back of the bearing. I can apply a little pressure by tightening the nut and leave it for a few hours. Drink beer. Tighten a bit more. Leave it. Drink beer. And proceed over time to that moment of joy when that bloody bearing gives up and surrenders.

Further update at the end of the week. Time to order more beer. I may be in the garage for a long time. Perhaps I'll set up a deck chair in the drive!

Richard Gibbs
19-08-18, 04:16 PM
Thanks for that suggestion. I shall get ready to thump it when the new puller is in place and tight.

andy l
19-08-18, 07:18 PM
Andy, is this an issue with just the De Dion chassis with the quaife rack, or the IRS with the pre-quaife (dolomite?) rack too? I’m hoping the former :) Thanks. RCR build sounds fantastic!

Good luck with the pilot bearing removal Richard.

It will not fit on the De Dion chassis, not sure about the IRS chassis, the pump hits the frame rail

andy l
19-08-18, 07:21 PM
Hi Guys

Thanks for the heads up Andy. I hadn't got to the point of trial fitting the engine. I didn't expect that to be an issue. But looks like I will need an electric pump then. Any recommendations given it's an Edelbrock carb and not fuel injection? I'm thinking correct fuel pressure here.

I shall update on the bearing removal later in the day. Still not budged! But we press ahead. It's not been welded. But it might as well have been. Removing the hubs from the drive shafts on the Jag back end was a piece of cake by comparison.

Dax fit a Carter 72 good pump and ok for pressure using Edelbrock

TINKA
19-08-18, 09:38 PM
Sorry didn't realise it was actually a needle bearing. I had the same problem your having once. I destroyed the bearing trying to pull it out. Was advised to drop a small weld on the remaining ring of the bearing in the end of the crankshaft and after i did this it literally fell out. Hope this helps.

String
19-08-18, 10:45 PM
This might be of help too:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=H687C83vJjo

Ball type pilot bearing as opposed to needle type, but similar idea. Creative use of the cold chisel to keep the arms of the puller locked behind the housing. Hope you get the blighter out.

Richard Gibbs
20-08-18, 09:13 AM
Thanks for your support guys.

The fuel pump will fit by the looks of it as the chassis is a Mk 4, XJS rear end version (not De Dion) and taking some measurements yesterday there looks to be enough space for the pump to sit free of the chassis. Looks to be tight to the steering rack input shaft though. I'll know more soon.
I'm having an input shaft bearing support bracket welded up for me at the moment. We shall see soon enough if it all goes together without issue.

I'll start off with the new bearing puller, applying more pressure on it as the day goes on.
Failing that, i'll carefully grind out a section of the bearing, taking care not to hit the crankshaft.
Last resort, Tinka's welding method.

I'll watch the vid above and see if that sheds any alternatives.

It will come out, if its the last thing i doooooooo.

TINKA
20-08-18, 09:22 AM
When I did mine I used a tig welder so added no metal its all about the heat.

Richard Gibbs
25-08-18, 04:21 PM
So, an update on the pilot bearing.

I waited a week for a new puller that said it would fit down to a 1/2 inch. It arrived this morning. At last I thought! No chance. It will go to just over 3/4 inch but not small enough for my bearing.
Having tried the grease and bread hydraulic methods, which failed. I tried the grind and drill the hell out of it method. And success. After 2 hours of effort it finally moved and gave up.

After much cleaning, the new bearing is in, the bellhousing has been dialled in and found to be 2.5 though off centre. So well within the 5 thou tolerance.

One further question though.

I have Repower's bellhousing and their dust cover plate that sits behind the flywheel and attaches to the bottom edge of the bell. Do you guys always fit this dust cover?
Reason for asking is its too thick (only a few thou) to sit nicely between the starter motor and the bellhousing. And as a result will put the bellhousing out of parallel with the rear face of the block.
Any thoughts?

claude3c
29-08-18, 02:15 PM
You could get a sanding disk and trumpet for a 4.5" grinder and just sand it down so it fits flush

matt

Richard Gibbs
30-08-18, 03:56 PM
What I've done is to cut out the part of the dust cover that presses up against the starter. So all fits now.

Got the clutch installed and throw out bearing. Couldn't get the gearbox in today. But I'll get that sorted tomorrow I'm sure.

A final check of the engine bay over the weekend and I'll drop the engine in place, assuming all goes to plan that is.

Cheers

Richard Gibbs
29-10-18, 05:59 PM
An update.

So, having got the pipes all fitted in the engine bay, the wiring all in, rad in, everything connected up, it was time for the engine to slide into its new home.

It took 3.5 hrs. But it's IN. And thanks to my neighbour, Darren for his commitment and enthusiasm in the cold.

Just got to dril the gearbox mount tomorrow. At the moment the gearbox is resting on the mount as a support. Shouldn't be too much hassle tomorrow.

It is such a good feeling to reach this milestone.

Next milestone will be first engine start. Woo ha.

String
30-10-18, 07:38 AM
Pics? Fingers crossed for the start up.

Richard Gibbs
30-10-18, 07:07 PM
36734

Lets see if this pic uploads.

Richard Gibbs
30-10-18, 07:27 PM
I can't seem to work out how to get pics rotated 90 degrees.

Anyway, today I trial fitted the exhaust manifolds. They line up nicely.
I'm going to have to take the starter off and rotate by 180 degrees though, to give clearance between the solenoid and the exhaust. currently about 1cm.

The mechanical fuel pump will have to go I think. While it fits with good clearance from chassis rail, it's tight to the steering shaft. I could accommodate that, but the input feed for the pump is right above the chassis rail and I can't get a good fuel pipe route and connection. See the little red plastic cover under the pump in this pic.

36735

That means an electric fuel pump will be needed.

Any recommendations for a suitable fuel pump? Has to be less than 6.5 psi as I've got a carb on top of the engine. Either that or one with an additional pressure regulator.

aaronjb
31-10-18, 08:39 AM
A lot of Dax folks use the Carter pump (that Dax sell, amongst others) - I have a higher rated version on my chassis and one thing I can tell you is that it is loud! Probably inaudible over the engine, but I don't currently have one of those fitted.. :lol:

route66
31-10-18, 09:26 AM
A lot of Dax folks use the Carter pump (that Dax sell, amongst others) - I have a higher rated version on my chassis and one thing I can tell you is that it is loud! Probably inaudible over the engine, but I don't currently have one of those fitted.. :lol:

Yup, when the engine is running, you won't hear it.

1dayiwill
31-10-18, 01:05 PM
I may be wrong but I think you can rotate the bottom of the mechanical pump to another position to facilitate better access.
Simply undo all the bolts underneath and spin it to s better position. That’s how it works on a Ford & looking at some pics of Chevy pumps seems to be the same.

Richard Gibbs
31-10-18, 06:24 PM
Hi there.

Yes, some mechanical fuel pumps have inlet and outputs that can be rotated. The one I have isn't one of them. However, looking at the pump, position of the chassis rail, position of the steering shaft etc. It wouldn't make a difference. I could rotate the inlet/outlet away from the chassis rail but then the fuel line will foul the steering shaft. There isn't a position that clears all the other fixed obstructions.

So, I think I'll just remove and progress to an electric pump.

The Carter as mentioned earlier is an option, but what worries me is that the inlet is at the top of the pump. Thus some 5 inches or so above the fuel tank outlet. Assuming you mount it upright and ensure the bottom of the pump is above the bottom of the chassis rail for protection. These pumps should be gravity fed as they don't suck fuel out of the tank very well. That doesn't sound like a good solution to me.

Any thoughts on the matter?

glip
31-10-18, 07:07 PM
I have a carter fuel pump mounted in the boot of my Dax. Been there 10+ years without any problems.
Also have a filter king filter / pressure regulator mounted in the engine bay for the carb

Cheers
Geoff

Richard Gibbs
07-11-18, 12:55 PM
Update:
The starter motor was too close to one of the headers so I took it out this week and clocked it 180 degrees. The solenoid now site comfortably free from headers and from the oil pan. Result. But, the main battery stud isn't long enough for all the wires to connect to. I can get the battery and the loom feed terminals on, but the power steering is a connector too far.
Looks like a junction box and a heavy duty cable will be needed : battery feed and new heavy duty cable to the starter. Then, new heavy duty cable to junction box with power steering and wiring loom feed attached.

Next problem. The dolomite steering rack. The rod ends I got from Dax (many years ago) must have been the wrong thread. I think the dolomite rack has 12.5mm shank and 2.00mm pitch. Therefore metric. I got metric jag XJ6 rod ends this week as replacements but I'm still not convinced they are the right thread either.
Think I'll take the rack off and pop over to see John and the team at JK and see what they can offer.

Last problem for the week has been the bonnet. I can't shut it with the air filter in place. It's the Edelbrock 4222 triangular one. Looks like the rear-most corners are fouling the bonnet. Probably 1/2 inch too high. The Pro flow 1002 may be the solution. That or removing the 1/2 inch carb spacer gasket. More fettling to be done.

More to follow next week as these and lots of other problems are resolved.

aaronjb
07-11-18, 01:33 PM
No way a Triumph Dolly would be metric - if measured at 12.5mm and 2mm pitch then I would say you probably want 1/2" UNC (UNC at 1/2" is 13TPI = 1.954mm pitch)..

Bigblock
07-11-18, 02:14 PM
Update:
The starter motor was too close to one of the headers so I took it out this week and clocked it 180 degrees. The solenoid now site comfortably free from headers and from the oil pan. Result. But, the main battery stud isn't long enough for all the wires to connect to. I can get the battery and the loom feed terminals on, but the power steering is a connector too far.
Looks like a junction box and a heavy duty cable will be needed : battery feed and new heavy duty cable to the starter. Then, new heavy duty cable to junction box with power steering and wiring loom feed attached.

Next problem. The dolomite steering rack. The rod ends I got from Dax (many years ago) must have been the wrong thread. I think the dolomite rack has 12.5mm shank and 2.00mm pitch. Therefore metric. I got metric jag XJ6 rod ends this week as replacements but I'm still not convinced they are the right thread either.
Think I'll take the rack off and pop over to see John and the team at JK and see what they can offer.

Last problem for the week has been the bonnet. I can't shut it with the air filter in place. It's the Edelbrock 4222 triangular one. Looks like the rear-most corners are fouling the bonnet. Probably 1/2 inch too high. The Pro flow 1002 may be the solution. That or removing the 1/2 inch carb spacer gasket. More fettling to be done.

More to follow next week as these and lots of other problems are resolved.


May have missed it but is the rack a std dolly type or one supplied by Dax in the past ?, as the Dax one used to have alternative arms fitted to accommodate the track rod ends

Richard Gibbs
07-11-18, 03:41 PM
Hi guys

Yup. It is a Dax rack. As you say, they modified these with different arms. I just cant find the specs on a forum search.
Jag do both imperial and metric steering rod ends.

Measuring the threads, a 2.00mm pitch gauge is a perfect fit. But at 12.5mm shank, that's no thread pattern I know of.

A 13 TPI thread gauge is almost a perfect fit, very close. So 1/2 inch UNC would seem possible.

My safest bet. Take it off, take it to John and see what he can confirm. His advice, other than a new Quaife rack will be most welcome!

Definition of a kit car: a set of parts that almost fit together.

I have to say though I'm enjoying the build very much. It's been my dream build for years, many many years. Kids, moving houses, redundancies, setting up my own company. 16 years, 14 of them with car laying dormant.
The final stretch is in sight.

Bigblock
07-11-18, 07:44 PM
Hi guys

Yup. It is a Dax rack. As you say, they modified these with different arms. I just cant find the specs on a forum search.
Jag do both imperial and metric steering rod ends.

Measuring the threads, a 2.00mm pitch gauge is a perfect fit. But at 12.5mm shank, that's no thread pattern I know of.

A 13 TPI thread gauge is almost a perfect fit, very close. So 1/2 inch UNC would seem possible.

My safest bet. Take it off, take it to John and see what he can confirm. His advice, other than a new Quaife rack will be most welcome!

Definition of a kit car: a set of parts that almost fit together.

I have to say though I'm enjoying the build very much. It's been my dream build for years, many many years. Kids, moving houses, redundancies, setting up my own company. 16 years, 14 of them with car laying dormant.
The final stretch is in sight.

Mine was the same then, I have always used track rods ends from a 1974/5 XJ6 to fit.