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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2016
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    Cheshire
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    Front Wheels not Central in the Wheel Arch

    Because of the change in wheelbase between the two chassis versions, if a Mk2 shell has been used on a Mk3 chassis then, without modification, the front wheels are too far back in the wheel arch.

    Is there anything that can be done about this (short of swapping the shell)?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Basingstoke
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    1,103
    The mk2 shell on mk2 chassis wasn’t exactly a glove like fit in the first place.... took a lot of to and fro to get ‘near enough’

    How far out is it?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2016
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    I would say both front wheels (so it's not an issue with the Sumo being asymmetrical) need to move forward up to an inch and a half.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Surrey
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    258
    It would surely be the easier option to cut out the whole arch and move it forward, then glass it back in than start messing with the chassis, suspension and steering.
    DAX Cobra. May contain nuts. Always read the label.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2016
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    Backward but I get your point. However the idea of carving up the body and putting it back together doesn't sound that easy either.

    I would have thought custom upper and lower wishbones and (if necessary) moving the steering rack forwards would be the simplest option (after learning to live with it, of course).

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    liverpool
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    46
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    364
    The easiest option I would do is -



    • Cut the body in half between the top of the bonnet and the wiper posts all around.
    • Extend the front section 1.5”.
    • Screw the two sections together with metal tabs.
    • Fibre glass the gap all around.
    • Remove body and turn upside down fully supported, remove metal tabs (if needed).
    • Fibre glass the whole of the inside.
    • Fit back onto the body.
    • Body work the outside.


      I don’t think anyone would notice the 1.5” wider gap from windshield to bonnet?



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worcestershire
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    Posts
    2,206
    Many years ago a friend of mine made his own chassis after taking lots and lots of measurements off my old Sumo, then he managed to source from somewhere what he thinks was a viper body and had the same issue.

    His solution was to cut it through the middle of the body in the centre of the doors, align the wheels and glass up the gap in the body (and ultimately the doors !).

    Will Pilgrim tell you where they added the material, it maybe that you can do what my friend did and then buy some mk3 doors?????

    Wherever you add glass/filler, expect it to eventually crack, as my friend's did.
    Regards

    Craig Perry

    No, I'm not "repairing" it, I'm fine tuning its performance.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Shropshire/Wales Border
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    5,942
    Personally 'd cut the body. Unless you are confident that you can replicate all of the suspension geometry you could end up with a very ill handling car. I would have thought that moving the steering rack would probably be a must, to keep everything lined up with the instant centre and avoid bumpsteer.
    Lloyd B
    Current: Crendon #54 in build - 427 Side Oiler/Cobrajet Heads/Dual 600cfm Holleys/4 speed toploader/Vintage cast knock on wheels
    Dedion Dax/Clarkson 383 Chevy with roller 4/7 swap cam, AFR195 heads - SOLD

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Cheshire
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    275
    I think there's something wrong with me; everyone seems comfortable with chopping up the body but it would scare the cr@p out of me!

    Turning the upper wishbones upside down, having custom bottom wishbones made and fabricating brackets to move the steering rack forward seems more sensible (and easier to back out of if it doesn't work).

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Shropshire/Wales Border
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    5,942
    Do you know how to calculate out all of the changes to the suspension geometry that moving wishbones arounds would potentially create? (please don't take the wrong way, you may be an F1 suspension engineer for all I know). Either you know all of that stuff and are therefore relaxed about it, or you don't and you are thinking its not important? If its the latter you could really get yourself in a world of hurt?

    If you are going to move the suspension then I would guess that moving everything forward 1" is the best solution? Ie the wishbone mounts, steering rack etc so absolutely no geometry changes. Terrifying though it might sound, it might be easier to cut the chassis in half and add an inch in?

    I'm aware of the complexities of suspension geometry but no expert. That's why in your shoes I and I suspect others would cut the body. You may be much more knowledgeable on suspension than the rest of us though
    Lloyd B
    Current: Crendon #54 in build - 427 Side Oiler/Cobrajet Heads/Dual 600cfm Holleys/4 speed toploader/Vintage cast knock on wheels
    Dedion Dax/Clarkson 383 Chevy with roller 4/7 swap cam, AFR195 heads - SOLD

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