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  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Cheshire
    Age
    50
    Posts
    257
    Quote Originally Posted by kdavies3 View Post
    Mathew you have a PM.
    Received, thanks. If someone from the club wants to message me about an article I'll be happy to help.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Cheshire
    Age
    50
    Posts
    257
    Sumo MKIII Build Up Report


    Part Two


    LAST TIME
    In my last report you may remember that my father and I were awaiting delivery of a Sierra based MKIII Sumo. The donor had been bought, tried, tested and pulled to bits. The garage was clean and tidy, ready to receive the body and chassis.

    DELIVERY
    That evening Den rolled up in his trusty pickup with my body and chassis strapped to the top. In the rain we unloaded the body and laid it on the carpeted area of the garage. Off came the chassis (very heavy!) and into the garage it went.

    In the garage, in the dry, my father, James and I inspected the substantial chassis and came to a concerning conclusion. It was a left hand drive chassis. Now being British, and not planning any continental travel, I had ordered a right hand drive chassis.

    Unfortunately a mix up at the factory meant that there was not a right hand drive chassis ready!

    The fitting of the various suspension components was demonstrated by Den. In particular a detailed explanation of the front suspension, which was almost totally custom made. A few other bits were discovered missing - rear inner wings, spax shocks, door hinges, differential mounts, engine and gearbox mounts and steering column bracket. Poor Den could not apologise enough and went away with no money. He left behind a very dejected customer.

    THE SECOND WEEK
    Things are supposed to look better in the morning. They didn't.

    However an agreement with Den was reached late in the day, where I accepted the left hand drive chassis and would drill the holes required in the bulkhead for the pedals etcetera.

    Now I began to feel that the chassis was mine. Up on the axle stands it went. It even got washed! The various wishbones were offered in position and measured for nuts and bolts. A lot of holding in place and using imagination.

    The car uses the standard Sierra independent rear suspension except the De Dion tube, which is discarded. The standard springs and shocks are discarded in favour of Spax coil over shocks. The front suspension uses custom upper and lower wishbones with the normal Sierra hub assembly between them. Spax coil over shocks are again used at the front.

    The next job was to decide the position of the brake lines. This worried me. Brakes are important - what an understatement. I didn't want to get them wrong. After spending a long time measuring and working out the ends needed, I ordered the brake lines from a local motor factor.

    That weekend end I made a trip down to Small Dole to collect some of the missing items. There I had a long chat with one of the mechanics who had a 90% complete MKIII chassis for me to look at.

    Many useful tips and tricks were discovered. Now I had englne, gearbox and differential mounts and my spax shocks. We tried to assemble the front suspension and discovered a problem or two.

    FRONT SUSPENSION
    First off, the spax shocks did not fit the brackets in the chassis.

    In the end we filed the chassis mounting hole oval to get clearance for the top of the spax and welded a large washer over the hole to get a solid mounting. We also modified the lower spax mounting brackets.

    When talking to Den after the event, it transpires that spax modified the bush mounting, by enlarging it. Hence they wouldn't fit Den's chassis. If we had asked we could have saved a lot of grief, too late for that though!

    In order to avoid bump steer the steering rack is mounted three inches higher in the Sumo than in the Sierra. Therefore, the track rod end instead of joining to the hub from underneath, joins to the hub from above. The taper for the ball joint is thus the wrong way round and needs to be ground or drilled out in the opposite direction.

    James to the rescue. If you remember James is the knowledgeable friend who is always willing to lend a hand or some of his specialist tools. He took a large drill bit and ground a seven degree taper on it, with a cutting edge all the way up and ground the shank to fit a 13mm chuck. The drill worked a treat. Much better than filing by hand.

    The only remaining problem was fitting the spax springs to the spax shocks. I had been trying to find somebody, anybody who had a small enough spring compressor that I could borrow. Eventually I met somebody who had made a set for himself and I borrowed them for a weekend. Once fitted to the chassis, the chassis began to look like a car.

    At this point it is as well to remember that all I had was a pile of bits. Bits that could be held in place. Nothing was bolted in position. For every bit temporarily added, another bit was temporarily removed.

    Progress seemed slow. I was working 8-10 hours a day and not getting anywhere, or so it felt.

    Am I mad? Should I sleep in the garage as well? I can't put the Sierra together again - parts of it have been sold? The most common question asked was 'will you drive it to work next Monday morning?' will I heck!

    to be continued
    Kittihawk: Pilgrim Sumo MK3 built '93/'94 with 2.1L Stage 2 Pinto and Ford Type 9 5-Speed Gearbox

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Basingstoke
    Posts
    1,084
    Ahh, thanks for posting this... so many fond memories of building mine with my late father back then.. Uncle Den and his truck.... being sent 7 sets of engine mounts and trying them in every possible combination trying to get the lump level....

    ....And the immortal phrase from Den “oh yes sir, that’s within tolerance, you just need a bigger hammer”

    I still have all the hand typed letters confirming orders.

    To be fair, Pilgrim were still by far one of the most professional firms compared to most others around at that time. My Dad thoroughly enjoyed telling me about the kit manufacturer he went to see who’s idea of a chassis jig was chalk marks on the floor...

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Cheshire
    Age
    50
    Posts
    257
    Sumo MKIII Build Up Report

    Part Three

    LAST TIME
    In my last report you may remember that I had a large assortment of expensive and not so expensive bits that are supposed to go together to make a MKIII Sumo. After a week of full time work, I was still only trial fitting things. The following relates the events of the third week of my holiday in September '93.

    BULKHEAD
    You may remember that there was a small problem with my chassis - it was a left hand drive version! This meant that there were a lot of holes in the left hand bulkhead when there should have been a lot of holes in the right hand bulkhead. They are also not exactly opposite.

    Much measuring later I was ready to drill a hole or two. Out came trusty electric drill and old drill bits. start drilling hole.

    Hard work this! I decided that drilling this thick sheet steel bulkhead with a blunt drill would not be the quickest route to success. However with a sharp drill progress was much better.

    Small pilot holes were drilled first, to make sure the component (pedal assy, servo etc) was actually going to end up in the right place. Once sure, a larger drill and if necessary a file was used to make the required holes.

    STEERING
    One of the tips from the mechanics at Pilgrim was to bend the bulkhead for the steering column bush, so that the bush was parallel to the steering column. Bend the bulkhead - a lot easier
    said than done! Having drilled a hole in the centre of the final bush position, I bolted 2 inch diameter plates each side of the bulkhead with a large bolt. Then using a long (the longer the
    better) tube on the end of the bolt, I leaned on the bulkhead, to bend it to the required angle. I concluded in the end that the bulkhead was stronger than my tube, but managed to get the required kink.

    The steering column then just fed its way through the bulkhead and was bolted into position. Excitement mounting now! I could sit in it and pretend to steer it and use the pedals. I offered up the steering column extension shaft and discovered a problem. It was too long.

    Den had supplied the extension shaft that he supplied for the MKIII chassis before he moved the steering rack 3 inches up, and thus the shaft was too long. Discussion with Den revealed that the extension shaft for one of his other models would do and a swap was agreed.

    REAR SUSPENSION
    Having now trial fitted all the front suspension, it was the turn of the rear. The rear wishbones had the old damper mounting cut off and were drilled to take the spax mounting brackets. The differential was perched on the top of a trolley jack and lifted into place. The wishbones and spax coil over shocks were fitted next and then the half shafts and brake backplates. Was it really that easy - yes it was!

    We couldn't resist the temptation. The brake drums and wheels went on and we lowered the rear of the car to the ground. A momentous occasion! The car rested on the ground on its own suspension, albeit only the rear wheels. We jumped up and down a bit to see how strong the springs really were. The spax springs supplied by Den are rated at 450 Ibs - very strong! With both my father and I jumping on the rear of the chassis we could move the suspension off the top of its travel, but it topped out as soon as we stopped bouncing. I hope that there will be sufficient extra weight at the back, or we will be driving at the top of the suspension travel all the time!

    BRAKE LINES
    One of the jobs I had been dreading was the making and fitting of the brake lines. I chickened out of making them and had spent many hours last week measuring and working out the ends required so that I could order them from a local motor factor. Brake lines were duly made and returned to me. Now to fit them.

    This job took longer than anticipated. I spend a day and a bit under the car bending, shaping and fixing these very important little tubes. Every time I decided on a route I would change my mind! Eventually the brake lines were fitted, running neatly round the engine bay to the servo, and neatly up the central tunnel to the servo.

    I had been generous in my measurements when ordering the brake lines, so much so that one line was well over twelve inches overlength! James (knowledgeable friend with specialist tools) loaned me his brake flaring tool and I successfully remade the ends to the correct length. Why on earth I was so worried about this aspect I'll never know. with a bit of care it's dead easy. Next time I'll make the brake lines!

    ENGINE AND GEARBOX
    The car was by now down on four wheels and moveable, the front suspension being finally assembled by my father while I played with the brake lines. The engine and gearbox on the hoist was manoeuvred out of its corner location and offered up to the chassis. Without too much grief the assembly was lifted into position and the engine mounts bolted up. The gearbox mount
    required modification but then fitted a treat.

    SUMMARY
    At the beginning of this week we had a pile of bits. At the end of the week, we had a chassis with suspension, steering, engine and gearbox fitted. It began to look like a car. It began to look as if the dream would come true.

    Did I have a good holiday? YES! Did it get driven to work Monday morning as most people assumed it would? That doesn't deserve an answer! Did I have a good rest on my holiday? NO! I went back to work more tired than when I had left, but I went back with a huge sense of achievement. Between my father and I, we had achieved all that I had planned during my three week holiday. I could see that the dream WOULD become a reality. Nothing is going to stop me now!

    to be continued
    Kittihawk: Pilgrim Sumo MK3 built '93/'94 with 2.1L Stage 2 Pinto and Ford Type 9 5-Speed Gearbox

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Yorkshire
    Posts
    17
    Sounds like you are on the right track. Looking forward to seeing some pics.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Cheshire
    Age
    50
    Posts
    257
    Quote Originally Posted by samiths View Post
    Sounds like you are on the right track. Looking forward to seeing some pics.
    Thanks, but this was written by the original builder of my car a quarter of a century ago; I'm just posting it here for historical value!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Cheshire
    Age
    50
    Posts
    257
    Pictures are here, btw:

    https://imgur.com/a/cP8zd

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Cheshire
    Age
    50
    Posts
    257
    Sumo MKIII Build Up Report

    Part Four

    LAST TIME
    During the month of September last year my father and I had managed to recondition a Sierra donor and assemble major parts of it onto the chassis, namely the front and rear suspension, engine, gearbox and differential.

    RADIATOR
    We now had a chassis that looked like something worthwhile, so before going any further we put the body on. Lifting the body on and off is a task that we have become quite proficient in now (it went on and off so many times during the build)!!

    We needed to work out where things would fit. Like the radiator, and the expansion tank and the ignition coil and so forth. I had thought that we would be able to use the Sierra radiator, but no - it would probably just fit but it was too close to the body for comfort and would not be able to be replaced once the car was built!

    A friend of mine drove his MkIII Escort to visit me that afternoon. Two seconds later I was under the bonnet, tape measure in hand - yep it would fit, and he only just managed to stop me removing his radiator to fit into the Sumo! I relinquished my grip on parts of his car and took a trip to the scrap yard instead. I came back with radiator, expansion tank and washer bottle and from a MkIII Escort.

    The radiator went in as planned on a couple of brackets ( it was raised by and inch later in the build though because it clashed with the front nudge bar mounts!). The expansion tank had a clever bracket made ( its not the easiest shape to work with 1) and was fitted.

    I purchased a length of stainless pipe with a welded in boss from Den and we cut it into two sections to make use of it. A ninety degree bend as part of the bottom hose run and a straight section with the boss (and fan switch fitted) as part of the top hose run. All connected together by a combination of standard and new hoses.

    PROPSHAFT
    The propshaft bolted straight in and in theory the engine would drive the rear wheels.

    EXHAUST
    The exhaust system was a feat of engineering in itself (and I have written an article to cover the entire process, although when it will get published in the mag I know not). Suffice to say the exhaust system was custom built and fitted! We found (after much trial and error) a Janspeed tubular manifold that would clear the chassis and gearbox mounting bracket (after modification), welded a set of pipes and a 'T' piece together and put a pair of Cherry Bombs at the back. It took about three solid days to make but the end result is a standard Pinto engine that sounds much more like a V8 than anything else!

    BRAKES
    If the car was to move under its own motive power then it had better be able to stop. A rush round the car connecting various flexible hoses and pouring brake fluid into the master cylinder resulted in a fully connected brake system, all bled and all working. "You know, as time goes on you begin to wonder what all the worry was about." Famous last words!

    HANDBRAKE
    The fitting of the handbrake should have been an easy job! The instructions say bolt in. The standard Sierra handbrake cable is used and needs shortening. Much careful measurement later we cut the cable and welded a new nipple to the end.

    Mounting the handbrake in the default position meant that the gear lever hit the handbrake in second gear. A problem me thinks! Also the handbrake in the 'off' position was still pointing up into the air, which we decided we didn't like.

    We took the easy solution! We cut a new slot in the tunnel about four inches further back and mounted the handbrake lever so that it was level with the tunnel in the 'off' position. At this point we connected up the handbrake cable and discovered three problems.

    Firstly, the tunnel flexed enormously when the handbrake was applied, mainly due to the elongated slot we now had. We welded on bracing plates to stop that.

    Secondly, the handbrake cable was rubbing on the differential mounting bracket. All the diff bracket needed was a bit ground off so that the cable didn't rub. However to do that, out came the half shafts and the diff itself followed by the bracket for a 10 minute modification, so that we could put it all back together again.

    Thirdly, when I had measured the cable length, I had set the adjuster the wrong way. The result was with the handbrake pulled fully up, the shoes never touched the drums! We shortened the cable again.

    WIRING
    Yep, the wiring loom, you know, that job that everybody hates!. Actually, as I have an interest in most things electrical this wasn't a particular problem.

    I decided that I could devote a whole article to wiring (and I probably shall). Suffice to say, we decided to use the existing wiring loom complete and re-terminate where necessary. This has given us the luxury of electronic ignition control and auxiliary warning lights on the dashboard. The work on the loom took nearly two months elapsed time in between other jobs.

    We needed to decide where to position the fuse and relay box (a huge thing on the Sierra). In the end it fitted into the drivers side of the footwell. Fuse access from the footwell, and the mass of cables eventually hidden between body and chassis.

    The rest of the loom was laid out, modified and taped up before being fixed to the nearest chassis rail. I expected to have to lengthen the engine bay loom but this proved not to be the case.

    The engine wiring fell in the right place, as did the fuse box, and the odd instrument wire was easily lengthened or shortened as appropriate.

    CHRISTMAS
    This short article has taken us from September to Christmas time. We started the engine and drove the chassis on Boxing Day. Boy, were we pleased. We had a fully driveable chassis, which we proudly parked on the drive. Why? The garage needed a clear out before we started on the body fixing.

    We also had a short family celebration of our achievement and named our creation 'Kittihawk'. My dream had not only become reality, it now had life. until you have achieved such an event you will not know the feeling that we felt at that time. I can't find a word to describe it!

    to be continued
    Kittihawk: Pilgrim Sumo MK3 built '93/'94 with 2.1L Stage 2 Pinto and Ford Type 9 5-Speed Gearbox

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