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Thread: Lock Wire

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Marham
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    40
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    229
    Quote Originally Posted by cperry View Post
    I'm a licensed dog walker and Stella drinker, I've never fitted a lock wire to anything and I have two IVA badges on my swimming trunks.
    Not saying you need to fit it, but if you do and it's obviously wrong, you're inviting a closer, more sceptical look at everything else from Mr IVA.
    AK Gen II - Delivery May '15

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    NW England
    Posts
    305
    Lockwire doesn't really stop fasteners coming loose, just stops them coming looser. Hopefully this would let you come to a safe stop before your brake caliper or rotor blade fell off.

    Don't see much in the way of lockwire on modern cars, most rely on loctite type stuff.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Hertfordshire
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    462
    Quote Originally Posted by cperry View Post
    I'm a licensed dog walker and Stella drinker, I've never fitted a lock wire to anything and I have two IVA badges on my swimming trunks.
    Did you sew them on with 0.8mm lock wire?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    WELLINGBOROUGH
    Posts
    73
    Can I put in an offering on the subject of lock wires, nyloc nuts and other devices.

    If you install a bolt, whether it is in a blind hole or with a nut, then if it is a 'critical' part being secured, a torque is generally required. This is either stated as a torque or maybe a bolt stretch length.
    If installed correctly, to the specified torque, nothing else should be necessary.

    If a nut and bolt system is used where there is a requirement to apply pressure to a part, as a form of adjustment or to compensate for wear, then the nut is normally restrained in some fashion. Most common is the castellated nut or a second nut (true lock nut).

    'Locking wire' does not and cannot 'lock' anything. It is only a retaining device. The same applies to nyloc nuts and any other device using friction.
    Logically, if the required torque cannot be applied by the wire or nyloc nut then it cannot possibly 'lock' the nut or bolt. The applied torque does the work. The wire or nyloc is only a restraining device.

    I have been an engineer ranging from nuclear submarines to commissioning plant in the oil industry.

    Sceptic

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    160
    A correctly wirelocked fastener will only be able to move a tiny amount before the tension in the wire prevents it from turning any further. If the same fastener was not wirelocked, it will loosen. Very different to a nyloc, which will loosen until the turning force no longer has any purchase on the nut. I agree that it is a restraining device, but it is cable of keeping a torqued fastener tight.

    I disagree that a castellated nut is always used to apply pressure to a part, however. I can think of plenty of examples of a castellated or slotted nut being backed off to the next available slot before being pinned.
    DAX Cobra MK3 chassis, MK4 shell. RV8.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Perth
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    52
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    1,603
    Quote Originally Posted by cperry View Post
    I'm a licensed dog walker and Stella drinker, I've never fitted a lock wire to anything and I have two IVA badges on my swimming trunks.
    Now that's just made my morning

    cheers
    Kiel and Duncan (dad and the lad errr young man now)

    AHP Crendon Chassis No 1
    Ford FE 434, dual quad, Toploader total old school all the way
    https://www.crendonreplicas.com/
    http://www.absolutehorsepower.co.uk/

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