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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worcestershire
    Age
    44
    Posts
    2,199

    Rover V8 and Edelbrock connections

    I'm at the point of starting my Rover V8 engine for this first time, just needs fuel and a lead for the dizzy.

    But there's still a few things I think I need to sort.

    Can anyone help me with what goes where?

    A: I think is the carb feed for the servo, but does anyone know where I can get a fitting from?

    B: is connected the vacuum advance on the dizzy (is this correct).
    C: ???????
    D: ???????

    E: ???????

    F: ???????

    G: ???????
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Regards

    Craig Perry

    No, I'm not "repairing" it, I'm fine tuning its performance.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Middlesbrough
    Posts
    58
    Hi Craig

    I downloaded a very useful technical manual for the carb from the Edelbrock site. I'd suggest you try to get one for your model as it'll definitely come in handy for future reference.

    My understanding is:-


    C - PCV valve port

    B - Ported vacuum port
    D - Full time vacuum port (I'm using a Flame thrower dizzy and connect to this port)

    The answer for where to connect the dizzy can differ between B and D. Below is some info I found when I was looking around :-

    If you're looking at the front of the #1406, look at the two small ports on either side of the larger port for the PCV. You can see that one of the smaller ports would be positioned just above the throttle blades. That is timed vacuum. That means you get a vacuum signal when the throttle blades are opened. This is where most ignition manufacturers recommend you connect your distributor vacuum advance hose to. It aids in emissions, which probably isn't an issue on a well tuned engine.
    Now, look at the opposite smaller port and you'll see that it's positioned just below the throttle blades. That is full time vacuum. It will supply vacuum whether the throttle blades are open or not.
    The opinions are varied as to the definitive answer which port to use. The suggestion is to try both as an afternoon experiment and use the one that provides you with the idle characteristics you like for your application. You may notice that your idle will increase slightly if you use full time vacuum source. The reason is that it's causing your vacuum advance to come on during the idle. You might have to decrease you carburetor idle screw adjustment to a lower rpm level. You may also find that the motor will run a little cooler at full vacuum advance, which may or may not be a good thing depending on your climate. You may find that your fuel economy is effected. It's an easy experiment to try and you should see the differences readily. There is no right or wrong answer.


    E - PCV oil breather cap
    F - PCV valve connection (you'll need to check where this goes - possibly to carb, or air intake on filter)
    Last edited by Inzapp; 10-11-19 at 05:17 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Middlesbrough
    Posts
    58
    Hi Craig

    Here's a manual for an Edelbrock carb that you may find useful.

    Regards
    Attached Files Attached Files

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worcestershire
    Age
    44
    Posts
    2,199
    I think I’ve sorted the dizzy plug out, parts on route from JRV8.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    West Sussex
    Posts
    8,561
    Just remember that before starting, you must prime the oil pump with vaseline and spin up the oil pressure by removing the dizzy and using an adaptor + electric drill.
    Crendon Chassis No.49
    Huddart FE428 + toploader

    Not listed in the Shelby Register.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worcestershire
    Age
    44
    Posts
    2,199
    I’ve been spinning the engine on the starter motor, but as yet I have no oil pressure.

    More investigation this weekend, and I’ve already ordered a new gasket for the oil pump in case I need to prime it.

    The engine wasn’t rebuilt by me, so I’m not sure if its been primed or not.
    Last edited by cperry; 12-11-19 at 05:43 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    West Sussex
    Posts
    8,561
    Noooo! Don't do that! You will not get any oil pressure whatsoever, and could damage our engine.

    Proceed as follows:

    Part 1:
    Undo the 4 bolts holding the casting of the oil pump onto the side of the engine.
    You will see 2 cogs.
    Pack the entire space with vaseline. Stick your fingers in the pot and shove loads of it in.
    The vaseline is oil soluable and is used to create a partial vacuum that allows oil to be sucked up from the sump on priming and initial runs.
    Once its primed you should be fine there on in.
    Refit the side of the oil pump casing.

    Part 2:
    Remove rocker covers.
    Make a note of the orientation of the dizzy - use masking tape or scribe a line. And take a pic using your phone as a back-up.
    Now disconnect the lead/ unplug, remove clamping bolt from dizzy clamping bracket and slowly remove the dizzy. It will rotate slightly as you extract it. Place it somewhere safe, keeping dirt and other garage crap/grime away from it. i.e. not perched on the edge of your filthy work bench!
    Look into the dizzy hole and note the orientation of the oil pump drive (10-to-6, half past 12 or whatever)


    Take an electric drill and attach one of these:
    https://rimmerbros.com/Item--i-RX1431E or make your own priming tool:
    http://www.v8register.net/subpages/V8NOTE487.htm

    Insert the tool into the dizzy hole and ensure the tongue/groove locate. You will probably need to wiggle it a little with your fingers. You will feel some resistance to turning once its located.
    Get a helper to turn on ignition (just one click round, not engaging the starter) if you have an electric oil pressure gauge and use them to monitor the oil pressure gauge. Do not spin the engine on the starter.
    Spin the oil pump using the drill.
    You will fairly quickly see oil pressure rising. Keep going till you see oil appearing at the rockers.
    Now remove drill/priming tool and move the oil pump drive by hand using the tool to the same orientation as you found it.
    Re-insert dizzy. You will need to slightly turn the dizzy (clockwise i think, but check in a Haynes manual) by about 15 degrees before insertion to make it locate into the tongue/groove of the oil pump drive gear inside the engine.
    Bolt down the dizzy an reconnect electrical connections.

    Replace rocker covers.

    Your engine is now primed and the reciprocating surfaces coated and ready for fire up.

    All of this is covered in the Haynes manual:
    https://rimmerbros.com/Item--i-RP100...iABEgImW_D_BwE

    Don't spin the engine on the starter at any point during the above procedure. If you do, you will have to re-establish TDC and re-set the ignition timing.
    All of the above assumes the timing has been already set by your engine builder.
    (btw has your cam been run-in, if its a new/ rebuilt engine?)

    HTH.
    Did I miss anything out guys?
    Last edited by KevinW; 12-11-19 at 06:59 PM.
    Crendon Chassis No.49
    Huddart FE428 + toploader

    Not listed in the Shelby Register.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    West Sussex
    Posts
    8,561
    Haynes workshop manual link is a dud - got the wrong link.
    You need this one:

    https://rimmerbros.com/Item--i-RO106...SABEgIHDPD_BwE

    - assuming you have a later RV8.

    If its an earlier one, you'll need the Rover2000 manual.
    Crendon Chassis No.49
    Huddart FE428 + toploader

    Not listed in the Shelby Register.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Oxford
    Posts
    682
    Quote Originally Posted by KevinW View Post
    Noooo! Don't do that! You will not get any oil pressure whatsoever, and could damage our engine.

    Proceed as follows:

    Part 1:
    Undo the 4 bolts holding the casting of the oil pump onto the side of the engine.
    You will see 2 cogs.
    Pack the entire space with vaseline. Stick your fingers in the pot and shove loads of it in.
    The vaseline is oil soluable and is used to create a partial vacuum that allows oil to be sucked up from the sump on priming and initial runs.
    Once its primed you should be fine there on in.
    Refit the side of the oil pump casing.

    Part 2:
    Remove rocker covers.
    Make a note of the orientation of the dizzy - use masking tape or scribe a line. And take a pic using your phone as a back-up.
    Now disconnect the lead/ unplug, remove clamping bolt from dizzy clamping bracket and slowly remove the dizzy. It will rotate slightly as you extract it. Place it somewhere safe, keeping dirt and other garage crap/grime away from it. i.e. not perched on the edge of your filthy work bench!
    Look into the dizzy hole and note the orientation of the oil pump drive (10-to-6, half past 12 or whatever)


    Take an electric drill and attach one of these:
    https://rimmerbros.com/Item--i-RX1431E or make your own priming tool:
    http://www.v8register.net/subpages/V8NOTE487.htm

    Insert the tool into the dizzy hole and ensure the tongue/groove locate. You will probably need to wiggle it a little with your fingers. You will feel some resistance to turning once its located.
    Get a helper to turn on ignition (just one click round, not engaging the starter) if you have an electric oil pressure gauge and use them to monitor the oil pressure gauge. Do not spin the engine on the starter.
    Spin the oil pump using the drill.
    You will fairly quickly see oil pressure rising. Keep going till you see oil appearing at the rockers.
    Now remove drill/priming tool and move the oil pump drive by hand using the tool to the same orientation as you found it.
    Re-insert dizzy. You will need to slightly turn the dizzy (clockwise i think, but check in a Haynes manual) by about 15 degrees before insertion to make it locate into the tongue/groove of the oil pump drive gear inside the engine.
    Bolt down the dizzy an reconnect electrical connections.

    Replace rocker covers.

    Your engine is now primed and the reciprocating surfaces coated and ready for fire up.

    All of this is covered in the Haynes manual:
    https://rimmerbros.com/Item--i-RP100...iABEgImW_D_BwE

    Don't spin the engine on the starter at any point during the above procedure. If you do, you will have to re-establish TDC and re-set the ignition timing.
    All of the above assumes the timing has been already set by your engine builder.
    (btw has your cam been run-in, if its a new/ rebuilt engine?)

    HTH.
    Did I miss anything out guys?
    Spot on, exactly what I did. You will also feel the resistance against the drill rise as the oil pressure builds. I got mine up to 50psi and the drill was complaining.
    Classic Replica Viper currently in build

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Lanarks
    Age
    63
    Posts
    142
    Get an old dizzy and make your own Rover V8 priming tool


    Another alternative is to remove all spark plugs and back fill the oil pump via the oil sender unit.
    Use one of those 1ltr oil bottles and filler tube
    A bit messy but it worked for me (many moons ago) before I made up the primer tool
    Attached Images Attached Images

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