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  1. #31
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    Sep 2012
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    Malvern, Worcestershire
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gatwick Axe Man View Post
    First thing I'm doing after I win the lottery later on this evening is to give Rolls Royce a call and have on of those mini nukes installed in the garden. In the mean time may I suggest the rest of us that aren't unbelievably loaded go out and purchase the latest in personalised, self sustaining co2 scrubbers to combat what may or may not be the forthcoming end of the world. If the main problem is an excess of co2 we simply have to reduce the imbalance before we all choke to death as in Apollo 13 and their square plug in a round hole situation. Ok I know we can't all give NASA a shout when it goes pear shaped but the idea is the same, co2 scrubbers. They now come in a variety of shapes, sizes and colours, most are weather proof, some are self repairing and require almost zero maintenance. Simples as the meerkat would say.

    Sorry, how far back did I loose everyone?


    Also known as trees!
    Well I'm afraid you lost me. I agree that CO2 scrubbers exist - without them nuclear submariners couldn't possibly stay submerged for up to three months or so. But assuming we are considering the whole earth and not just your car/submarine/space ship etc., you need to ask the question "what happens to the CO2 next ?" It doesn't go away or somehow morph into something else. Scrubbers compress and retain it until it can be released into the atmosphere or somewhere else. They could of course keep it in pressurised gas cylinders, but you'd soon run out of cylinders and then what ? What the scientists haven't come up with yet is a practical way to split massive amounts of CO2 molecules into their component parts of Carbon and Oxygen so that the Carbon could be dumped down a coal mine and the oxygen released into the atmosphere. It's back to the drawing board on this one I'm afraid.

    Brian.



  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    High Wycombe
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    Sorry another failed attempt at humour won't do it again, the clue was in the bit at the bottom. Also known as trees.

    Kind of covers all of the above.

    Graham.
    AK gen 1 delivered 05/05/17, on the road shortly!

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    Malvern, Worcestershire
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gatwick Axe Man View Post
    Sorry another failed attempt at humour won't do it again, the clue was in the bit at the bottom. Also known as trees.

    Kind of covers all of the above.

    Graham.
    At my age, I should know better than to respond to "Humour", especially since my youngest son does it to me all the time, usually when he's bored. I'll have the last laugh though - I'll cut him out of the will and see how humorous he finds that !

    Humourless of Herefordshire.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Shropshire/Wales Border
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    Quote Originally Posted by braincol View Post
    Well I'm afraid you lost me. I agree that CO2 scrubbers exist - without them nuclear submariners couldn't possibly stay submerged for up to three months or so. But assuming we are considering the whole earth and not just your car/submarine/space ship etc., you need to ask the question "what happens to the CO2 next ?" It doesn't go away or somehow morph into something else. Scrubbers compress and retain it until it can be released into the atmosphere or somewhere else. They could of course keep it in pressurised gas cylinders, but you'd soon run out of cylinders and then what ? What the scientists haven't come up with yet is a practical way to split massive amounts of CO2 molecules into their component parts of Carbon and Oxygen so that the Carbon could be dumped down a coal mine and the oxygen released into the atmosphere. It's back to the drawing board on this one I'm afraid.

    Brian.


    I'll admit I find the C02 panic utterly baffling.

    Unless my ability to read graphs has deserted me, we seem to be at almost historically low levels of CO2 (if you take a proper time perspective on climate, ie not the last 20 years), yet we think it might kill us if it goes up a bit? I could understand an argument that says we'd all die if it dropped much further as plant life would ultimately die out, but more CO2 will kill us all? Really? How?
    Lloyd B
    Current: Crendon #54 in build - 427 Side Oiler/Cobrajet Heads/Dual 600cfm Holleys/4 speed toploader/Vintage cast knock on wheels
    Dedion Dax/Clarkson 383 Chevy with roller 4/7 swap cam, AFR195 heads - SOLD

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    West Sussex
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lloyd Barnes View Post
    I'll admit I find the C02 panic utterly baffling.

    Unless my ability to read graphs has deserted me, we seem to be at almost historically low levels of CO2 (if you take a proper time perspective on climate, ie not the last 20 years), yet we think it might kill us if it goes up a bit? I could understand an argument that says we'd all die if it dropped much further as plant life would ultimately die out, but more CO2 will kill us all? Really? How?
    Not a climate expert, but I think the argument runs that CO2 locks in more heat into the atmosphere, and therefore leads to planetary warming, so melting of ice caps, disturbances in weather etc.
    I think the biggest hole in the argument within the UK is thee issue of CO2 output per head of population: the real problem lies with the Gulf states, US, India, China and Russia - compared to what they produce, a zero UK output would not make much difference globally.
    I can only think that the reason for engagement is to make sure that UK industry is braced for the innovation and follow-on profits in the green/environmental industries that will come to the fore in the next few years, when perhaps we tax imports from the major polluters.
    Crendon Chassis No.49
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  6. #36
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    yet Mr T Rex wandered around when CO2 was 6 times higher than it is today. Perhaps he had suncream?
    Lloyd B
    Current: Crendon #54 in build - 427 Side Oiler/Cobrajet Heads/Dual 600cfm Holleys/4 speed toploader/Vintage cast knock on wheels
    Dedion Dax/Clarkson 383 Chevy with roller 4/7 swap cam, AFR195 heads - SOLD

  7. #37
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    Feb 2007
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    West Sussex
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lloyd Barnes View Post
    yet Mr T Rex wandered around when CO2 was 6 times higher than it is today. Perhaps he had suncream?
    apparently CO2 is not the only driver...

    https://skepticalscience.com/co2-hig...termediate.htm
    Crendon Chassis No.49
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  8. #38
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by aaronjb View Post
    Probably because you need a team of nuclear control engineers to run them? (So I was reading the other day - US nuclear submarines are, or were until fairly recently, almost entirely manually controlled..)
    Actually you dont
    MKIII Pilgrim Sumo. 3.5 Litre Rover V8 Towing an Eriba Puck Caravan



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