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  1. #1
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    Winter’s coming.

    What do folks do with regard to the engine bay shiny bits over the winter?
    Dek

  2. #2
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    Anyone got any experience of the low wattage electric heaters that go under the engine bay?
    Dek

  3. #3
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    Light bulb maybe?
    A S motorsport Ltd. 01379 688356 mob; 07909531816 web; asmotorsport.co.uk email \"andrewsoar@yahoo.com\"

  4. #4
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    Actually i have a couple of Internet controlled plugs that can be set up to work to many different settings as well as remote manual override.

    This could well work nicely for such a plan I would think.

    A
    A S motorsport Ltd. 01379 688356 mob; 07909531816 web; asmotorsport.co.uk email \"andrewsoar@yahoo.com\"

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by dinosoar View Post
    Light bulb maybe?
    I did actually think of that but wasn’t sure if a bulb would produce enough heat. With a cover over the car though it might trap it and be sufficient.
    Dek

  6. #6
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    Surprising how much heat an old school light bulb gives off, particularly in an enclosed space. I use them to gently melt buckets of honey in an old fridge (as do many beekeepers). Can easily get to 60 degrees and more. We use a thermostat to control the heat, switching the bulb on and off to keep it at a steady temperature.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2004
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    Perth
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    4,643
    Quote Originally Posted by Dek View Post
    Anyone got any experience of the low wattage electric heaters that go under the engine bay?
    Dek
    I am fortunate that I have a heavily insulated, centrally heated garage, but have you looked at these? I have one in our boiler house to prevent pipes freezing in the winter. You could lay one on the floor under the engine bay.

    https://www.electricalworld.com/en/g...BoCkvAQAvD_BwE
    Cheers, Clive

    (If I'm not here, I'm either in my new workshop or on the golf course!)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Nova Scotia
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    I don't do anything, but if I were to do so, I'd use chrome polish and aluminum polish on the shiny bits. If my car weren't fibreglass, I'd spray all around with some protective coating. I used to do this by mixing LPS3 and Automatic Transmission fluid 50:50 and spraying it with a fruit tree sprayer. I use to spray the chrome emblems, headlight rings and all that stuff. It would seep in behind and prevent corrosion. Inside the door panels and rocker arms too. That was all prep for winter when I had my Alfa.

    Now about that heater. I once heard that cars parked in warm garages corrode quicker than those parked in cold garages. Basically they were talking about driving in the winter, and then parking overnight in a warm garage vs. a cold one. With a fresh dousing of road salt every day, those parked in the warm garages corroded quicker. So I did a quick Google Search, and here is what I found:

    Usually, a temperature or pressure increase directly leads to a higher corrosion rate because electrochemical reactions generally occur faster at higher temperatures. Temperature increases add energy to the reactions, which increases the corrosion rate.

    Actually, looking at my Cobra that's been completed back around 1996, the only corrosion issue that I have (that could have been prevented), is the chrome trim rings on some of the instruments. Had I used a bit more chrome polish, such as every Fall, they'd probably still look like new.
    John

    “A prudent person profits from personal experience, a wise one from the experience of others.”

  9. #9
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    Northampton
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisP View Post
    Surprising how much heat an old school light bulb gives off, particularly in an enclosed space. I use them to gently melt buckets of honey in an old fridge (as do many beekeepers). Can easily get to 60 degrees and more. We use a thermostat to control the heat, switching the bulb on and off to keep it at a steady temperature.
    Thanks Chris
    As you’ve demonstrated if you can enclose the heat and trap it the temperature will rise that’s why I thought in combination with a cover it might work.
    Dek

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clive View Post
    I am fortunate that I have a heavily insulated, centrally heated garage, but have you looked at these? I have one in our boiler house to prevent pipes freezing in the winter. You could lay one on the floor under the engine bay.

    https://www.electricalworld.com/en/g...BoCkvAQAvD_BwE
    Yes, thanks that’s the sort of heater I was thinking of.
    Dek

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